October 2009 Nonfiction Titles

Have A Little Faith by Mitch Albom

When an 82-year-old rabbi from Albom’s old hometown asks him to deliver his eulogy, Albom goes back to his nonfiction roots and becomes involved with a Detroit pastor–a reformed drug dealer and convict–who preaches to the poor and homeless in a decaying church with a hole in its roof.

 Strength in What Remains by Tracy Kidder

The Pulitzer Prize-winning author of the modern classics “Mountains Beyond Mountains” and “The Soul of a New Machine” returns with the extraordinary true story of a young man and his will to turn his life into something truly remarkable.

 Arguing with Idiots by Glenn Beck

FUNNY.FRIGHTENING.TRUE.It happens to all of us: You’re minding your own business, when some idiot informs you that guns are evil, the Prius will save the planet, or the rich have to finally start paying their fair share of taxes. Just go away! you think to yourself — but they only become more obnoxious. Your heart rate quickens. You start to sweat. You can’t get away. Your only hope is……this book. Glenn Beck, author of the #1 New York Times bestsellers An Inconvenient Book and Glenn Beck’s Common Sense, has stumbled upon the secret formula to winning arguments against people with big mouths but small minds: knowing the facts. And this book is full of them.The next time your Idiot Friends tell you how gun control prevents gun violence, you’ll tell them all about England’s handgun ban (see page 53). When they tell you that we should copy the UK’s health-care system, you’ll recount the horrifying facts you read on page 244. And the next time an idiot tells you that vegetable prices will skyrocket without illegal workers, you’ll stop saying “no, they won’t” and you’ll start saying, “actually, eliminating all illegal labor will cause us to spend just $8 a year more on produce.” (See page 139.) Idiots can’t be identified through voting records, they can be found only by looking for people who hide behind stereotypes, embrace partisanship, and believe that bumper sticker slogans are a substitute for common sense. If you know someone who fits the bill, then Arguing with Idiots will help you silence them once and for all with the ultimate weapon: the truth.

 50 Ways You Can Help Obama Change America by Michael Huttner and Jason Salzman

Millions of Americans worked hard to elect Barack Obama. Now they’re asking themselves, What’s next? How do we keep the momentum going? 50 Ways You Can Help Obama Change America describes actions citizens can take to clean up the mess, enact Obamas core campaign promises, and move the country forward.

 In Fed We Trust by David Wessel

“Whatever it takes”. That was Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke’s vow as the worst financial panic in more than fifty years gripped the world and he struggled to avoid the once unthinkable: a repeat of the Great Depression. Brilliant but temperamentally cautious, Bernanke researched and wrote about the causes of the Depression during his career as an academic. Then when thrust into a role as one of the most important people in the world, he was compelled to boldness by circumstances he never anticipated. The president of the United States can respond instantly to a missile attack with America’s military might, but he cannot respond to a financial crisis with real money unless Congress acts. The Fed chairman can. Bernanke did. Under his leadership the Fed spearheaded the biggest government intervention in more than half a century and effectively became the fourth branch of government, with no direct accountability to the nation’s voters. Believing that the economic catastrophe of the 1930s was largely the fault of a sluggish and wrongheaded Federal Reserve, Bernanke was determined not to repeat that epic mistake. In this penetrating look inside the most powerful economic institution in the world, David Wessel illuminates its opaque and undemocratic inner workings, while revealing how the Bernanke Fed led the desperate effort to prevent the world’s financial engine from grinding to a halt. In piecing together the fullest, most authoritative, and alarming picture yet of this decisive moment in our nation’s history, In Fed We Trust answers the most critical questions. Among them: What did Bernanke and his team at the Fed know–and what took them by surprise? Which of their actions stretched–or even ripped through–the Fed’s legal authority? Which chilling numbers and indicators made them feel they had no choice? o What were they thinking at pivotal moments during the race to sell Bear Stearns, the unsuccessful quest to save Lehman Brothers, and the virtual nationalization of AIG, Fannie Mae, and Freddie Mac? What were they saying to one another when, as Bernanke put it to Wessel: “We came very close to Depression 2.0”? How well did Bernanke, former treasury secretary Hank Paulson, and then New York Fed president Tim Geithner perform under intense pressure? How did the crisis prompt a reappraisal of the once-impregnable reputation of Alan Greenspan? In Fed We Trust is a breathtaking and singularly perceptive look at a historic episode in American and global economic history.

Marines: an illustrated history by Chester G. Hearn

 Why Our Health Matters by Andrew Weil, M.D.

Discusses what has gone wrong with the American way of health to create the crisis in which the author feels the U.S. is embroiled and offers a solution that calls for a completely new culture of health and medicine.

 The Healing of America by T.R. Reid

Bestselling author T. R. Reid guides a whirlwind tour of successful health care systems worldwide, revealing possible paths toward U.S. reform. In The Healing of America, New York Times bestselling author T. R. Reid shows how all the other industrialized democracies have achieved something the United States can’t seem to do: provide health care for everybody at a reasonable cost. In his global quest to find a possible prescription, Reid visits wealthy, free market, industrialized democracies like our own-including France, Germany, Japan, the U.K., and Canada-where he finds inspiration in example. Reid shares evidence from doctors, government officials, health care experts, and patients the world over, finding that foreign health care systems give everybody quality care at an affordable cost. And that dreaded monster “socialized medicine” turns out to be a myth. Many developed countries provide universal coverage with private doctors, private hospitals, and private insurance. In addition to long-established systems, Reid also studies countries that have carried out major health care reform. The first question facing these countries-and the United States, for that matter-is an ethical issue: Is health care a human right? Most countries have already answered with a resolute yes, leaving the United States in the murky moral backwater with nations we typically think of as far less just than our own. The Healing of America lays bare the moral question at the heart of our troubled system, dissecting the misleading rhetoric surrounding the health care debate. Reid sees problems elsewhere, too: He finds poorly paid doctors in Japan, endless lines in Canada, mistreated patients in Britain, spartan facilities in France. Still, all the other rich countries operate at a lower cost, produce better health statistics, and cover everybody. In the end, The Healing of America is a good news book: It finds models around the world that Americans can borrow to guarantee health care for everybody who needs it.

 Born Round by Frank Bruni

The New York Times restaurant critic’s heartbreaking and hilarious account of how he learned to love food just enough after decades of struggling with his outsize appetite. Frank Bruni was born round. Round as in stout, chubby, and hungry, always and endlessly hungry. He grew up in a big, loud Italian family in White Plains, New York, where meals were epic, outsize affairs. At those meals, he demonstrated one of his foremost qualifications for his future career: an epic, outsize love of food. But Bruni’s relationship with eating was tricky, and his difficulties with managing it began early. When Bruni was named the restaurant critic for The New York Times in 2004, he knew enough to be nervous. The restaurant critic at the Times performs one of the most closely watched tasks in the epicurean universe; a bumpy ride was certain, especially for someone who had never written about food, someone who for years had been busy writing about politics, presidential campaigns, and the pope. What qualified him to be one of the most loved and hated tastemakers in the New York food world? Did his decades-long obsession with food suffice? Food was his friend and enemy both, something he craved but feared, and his new-job jitters focused primarily on whether he’d finally made some sense of that relationship. In this coveted job, he’d face down his enemy at meal after indulgent meal. As his grandmother often put it, “Born round, you don’t die square.” Would he fall back into his old habits or could he establish a truce with the food on his plate? Born Round traces the highly unusual path Bruni traveled to become a restaurant critic; it is the captivating account of an unpredictable journalistic ride from an intern’s desk at Newsweek to a dream job at The New York Times, as well as the brutally honest story of Bruni’s lifelong, often painful, struggle with food. Born Round will speak to any hungry hedonist who has ever had to rein in an appetite to avoid letting out a waistband and will delight anyone interested in matters of family, matters of the heart, and the big role food plays in them.

 Dawn Light by Diane Ackerman

In an eye-opening sequence of personal meditations through the cycle of seasons, Diane Ackerman awakens us to the world at dawn – drawing on sources as diverse as meteorology, world religion, etymology, art history, poetry, organic farming, and beekeeping. As a patient and learned observer of animal and human physiology and behavior, she introduces us to varieties of bird music and other signs of avian intelligence, while she herself “migrates” from winter in Florida to spring, summer, and fall in upstate New York. Humans might luxuriate in the idea of being “in” nature, Ackerman points out, but we often forget that we are nature – for no facet of nature is as unlikely as we, the tiny bipeds with the giant dreams. Joining science’s devotion to detail with religion’s appreciation of the sublime, Dawn Light is an impassioned celebration of the miracles of evolution – especially human consciousness of our numbered days on a turning earth.

 Cheating Death by Sanjay Gupta

An unborn baby with a fatal heart defect . . . a skier submerged for an hour in a frozen Norwegian lake . . . a comatose brain surgery patient whom doctors have declared a “vegetable.” Twenty years ago all of them would have been given up for dead, with no realistic hope for survival. But today, thanks to incredible new medical advances, each of these individuals is alive and well . . .Cheating Death. In this riveting book, Dr. Sanjay Gupta-neurosurgeon, chief medical correspondent for CNN, and bestselling author-chronicles the almost unbelievable science that has made these seemingly miraculous recoveries possible. A bold new breed of doctors has achieved amazing rescues by refusing to accept that any life is irretrievably lost. Extended cardiac arrest, “brain death,” not breathing for over an hour-all these conditions used to be considered inevitably fatal, but they no longer are. Today, revolutionary advances are blurring the traditional line between life and death in fascinating ways. Drawing on real-life stories and using his unprecedented access to the latest medical research, Dr. Gupta dramatically presents exciting accounts of how pioneering physicians and researchers are altering our understanding of how the human body functions when it comes to survival-and why more and more patients who once would have died are now alive. From experiments with therapeutic hypothermia to save comatose stroke or heart attack victims to lifesaving operations in utero to the study of animal hibernation to help wounded soldiers on far-off battlefields, these remarkable case histories transform and enrich all our assumptions about the true nature of death and life.

You Can Do This! by Elisha Daniels

Breast cancer survivors Kelley Tuthill and Elisha Daniels are redefining what it means to be a cancer patient. More than 200,000 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer each year, but that diagnosis does not mean sitting on the sidelines while life passes you by. Both Tuthill and Daniels worked throughout their extensive cancer treatments and continued to enjoy their family, friends, and high-profile careers while fighting the fight of their lives.You Can Do This!shares with you the strategies that worked, what didn’t, and what they wish they’d have known at the time of diagnosis, namely to:* Send a message to the world that you are healing, not dying.* Surround yourself with people who know how to make you feel better.* Try to stick to your routine when possible. Go to work. Take the kids to school.* Have a plan for what you will do at 2:00 a.m. if you cannot sleep.* Keep wearing makeup and high heels. You dont have to look and feel like a patient all the time.* Believe that you can beat this!Benefiting from the expertise of Dr. Ann Partridge, an oncologist at the renowned Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston who helped both of the authors through their own cancer journeys, this triumvirate answers questions like: Can you keep working? How do you pick out a wig or pencil in an eyebrow? What role might reconstruction surgery and prosthetics play in your recovery? What steps can you take to retain a professional, healthy image despite the effects of chemotherapy? How do you broach the subject of cancer with small children? Is it possible to lose your hair and not your sense of humor or libido?InsideYou Can Do This!, Tuthill and Daniels help the newly diagnosed patient work through the initial shock of diagnosis and move forward to face the coming challenges with courage, strength, grace, makeup, and high heels. By offering advice on looking your best, even when you no longer look or feel like yourself, Tuthill and Daniels emphasize that you can continue to lead an active life and that it’s perfectly acceptable to research chemotherapy alongside the latest offerings from Chanel.

 A Big Little Life by Dean R. Koontz

Bestselling author Koontz tells the story of how he and his wife, Gerda, unexpectedly met and fell in love with a golden retriever named Trixie, chronicling the dog’s life with the family, the tremendous impact she had on them, and the things she taught them along the way.

Taste of Home’s Contest Winning Annual Recipes

Compilation ed. of prize-winning recipes from: Taste of home; Taste of home quick cooking; Country woman; and Country (Greendale, Wis.).

Taste of Home’s Holiday and Celebrations Cookbook

Holiday & celebrations cookbook

 15-Minute Cover Letter by Michael J. Farr

This book distills revolutionary and proven cover letter advice into six quick chapters about writing and using cover letters and other job search correspondence. The book offers a collection of dozens of professionally written cover letter samples along with step-by-step advice for creating attention-getting letters of your own. Bonus content offers tip on resume writing and job search success.

 Radial Arm Saw Basics by Roger W. Cliffe

Discusses brands and styles of saws, descriptions of their parts and features, plus essential cutting techniques — ripping and crosscutting, mitring, resawing, cutting bevels and chamfers.

 More Photo Fun by Hewlett-Packard

Use the latest technology to enliven one of America’s oldest forms of folk art! “More Photo Fun provides step-by-step recipes for creating fabulous effects on fabric, using your digital camera, scanner, printer, and/or computer. You will learn how to change, arrange, and print your photographic images to create a quilt fabric that is truly one-of-a-kind. This step-by-step book is packed with ideas for playing with and using your photos in quilts and crafts. You’ll learn to resize repeat, or reflect (or do all three!) to create your own fabric design. You’ll discover how to add, remove, or change colors: how to make kaleidoscopes, tiled images, and mosaics: how to add texture and stitching; and even how to print posters. Special sections cover how to make unique fabric by using 3-D objects, how to create painterly effects, and more. These easy-to-do. but sophisticated-looking projects can be done with any brand of inkjet printer or scanner.

 Official Book Club Selection by Kathy Griffin

A Conversation with Kathy Griffin: Q: State your name and profession. KG: My name is Kathy Griffin, and I am a teller of d**k jokes. And a plumber. Q: This is your first book. Had you ever considered writing anything before? A novel? Or a work of historical scholarship? Or a children’s story? KG: I had not considered it, because I’d always been told by the nuns at St. Bernadine’s that my cursive was poor. A children’s story is an interesting idea. How’s this for a title: “Waterboarding Pre-Teens: The Debate is Back On.” I have a political side as well. Q: You seem fairly obsessed with Oprah. Is this something you’ll ever outgrow? KG: I will never outgrow my obsession with Oprah. Just as she will never outgrow her cardigan sweaters. Oops, she already has. Now look, that sounds like a dig, but it’s not. It’s called a struggle, and I’m on it with her. I support her. (Not as much as she needs those underwire bras to support her, because she’s got some serious ropes and pulleys going on there.) The point is, I worship her, and fear her at the same time. And believe me, that’s how she wants it. Don’t be fooled. Q: Did I miss something? Where’s Celine Dion in this book? KG: I didn’t write about Celine Dion, only because of my fear of her husband Rene Angelil. I have an unfounded but constant fear that he could be in the French-Canadian mafia. Or have French-Canadian mafia ties, and by ties I don’t mean les cravats. And I fear that I may be abducted, whisked away and held prisoner at a charming little brasserie in Montreal, forced to eat multiple Croque Monsieur sandwiches until I confess to knowing the lyrics to every single one of her songs. Q: What do you think gays should take away from reading this book? KG: I think the gays should be happy with this book. It talks a lot about being who you are, and I certainly mention a lot of gay people. I would say it definitely has strong gay themes, and the gay community should know that frankly it has been a moral struggle for me to even acknowledge the heterosexual community in this book at all. But I am slowly reaching out an olive branch to the heterosexual community, even though I believe everything they do goes against the teachings of Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. But I’m trying not to judge them. Q: Describe your ideal, make-a-wish day of personal experiences with bats**t celebrities. KG: Well, it would start with some sort of a fit in the hair-and-makeup trailer on a set. I heard a story that when Sharon Stone was working on “Casino,” she got into such a fight with her hairdresser, that after he spent four hours doing this beautiful bouffant hairdo for her, she got up and walked in the sink and put her head underwater. I have no idea if that’s true, but I hope it is, cause that’s some awesome s**t I would love to see. Then it would go right to lunch, where I could witness an eating disorder. Maybe a Lohan is purging in a bush somewhere with her finger down her throat. Or perhaps there’s an Olsen twin on a scale crying because she finally tipped 100. Any outburst over weight I would cherish. Also, it would be great to see an actress have a workload meltdown. So maybe at 2:00 some A-lister saying, “I can’t handle this s**t anymore.” Because I love when actors can’t deal with a normal workday, and they think two in the afternoon is like midnight, so I would love to see somebody storming to their car, exhausted because they’ve put in a grueling four-hour workday of saying three lines and texting their nanny. Then it’s maybe off to an illicit affair.

 Traveling With Pomegranates by Sue Monk Kidd

An introspective and beautiful dual memoir by the #1 New York Times bestselling novelist and her daughter. Sue Monk Kidd has touched millions of readers with her novels The Secret Life of Bees and The Mermaid Chair and with her acclaimed nonfiction. In this intimate dual memoir, she and her daughter, Ann, offer distinct perspectives as a fifty-something and a twenty-something, each on a quest to redefine herself and to rediscover each other. Between 1998 and 2000, Sue and Ann travel throughout Greece and France. Sue, coming to grips with aging, caught in a creative vacuum, longing to reconnect with her grown daughter, struggles to enlarge a vision of swarming bees into a novel. Ann, just graduated from college, heartbroken and benumbed by the classic question about what to do with her life, grapples with a painful depression. As this modern-day Demeter and Persephone chronicle the richly symbolic and personal meaning of an array of inspiring figures and sites, they also each give voice to that most protean of connections: the bond of mother and daughter. A wise and involving book about feminine thresholds, spiritual growth, and renewal, Traveling with Pomegranates is both a revealing self-portrait by a beloved author and her daughter, a writer in the making, and a momentous story that will resonate with women everywhere.

 The Murder of King Tut by James Patterson

A secret buried for centuries Thrust onto Egypt’s most powerful throne at the age of nine, King Tut’s reign was fiercely debated from the outset. Behind the palace’s veil of prosperity, bitter rivalries and jealousy flourished among the Boy King’s most trusted advisors, and after only nine years, King Tut suddenly perished, his name purged from Egyptian history. To this day, his death remains shrouded in controversy. The keys to an unsolved mystery Enchanted by the ruler’s tragic story and hoping to unlock the answers to the 3,000 year-old mystery, Howard Carter made it his life’s mission to uncover the pharaoh’s hidden tomb. He began his search in 1907, but encountered countless setbacks and dead-ends before he finally, uncovered the long-lost crypt. The clues point to murder Now, inThe Murder of King Tut, James Patterson and Martin Dugard dig through stacks of evidence–X-rays, Carter’s files, forensic clues, and stories told through the ages–to arrive at their own account of King Tut’s life and death. The result is an exhilarating true crime tale of intrigue, passion, and betrayal that casts fresh light on the oldest mystery of all.

 The Clinton Tapes by Taylor Branch

A GROUNDBREAKING BOOK about the modern presidency,The Clinton Tapesinvites readers into private dialogue with a gifted, tormented, resilient President of the United States. Here is what President Clinton thought and felt but could not say in public.This book rests upon a secret project, initiated by Clinton, to preserve for future historians an unfiltered record of presidential experience. During his eight years in office, between 1993 and 2001, Clinton answered questions and told stories in the White House, usually late at night. His friend Pulitzer Prize-winning author Taylor Branch recorded seventy-nine of these dialogues to compile a trove of raw information about a presidency as it happened. Clinton drew upon the diary transcripts for his memoir in 2004.Branch recorded his own detailed recollections immediately after each session, covering not only the subjects discussed but also the look and feel of each evening with the president. The text engages Clinton from many angles. Readers hear candid stories, feel buffeting pressures, and weigh vivid descriptions of the White House settings.Branch’s firsthand narrative is confessional, unsparing, and personal. The author admits straying at times from his primary role — to collect raw material for future historians — because his discussions with Clinton were unpredictable and intense. What should an objective prompter say when the President of the United States seeks advice, argues facts, or lodges complaints against the press? The dynamic relationship that emerges from these interviews is both affectionate and charged, with flashes of anger and humor. President Clinton drives the history, but this story is also about friends.The Clinton Tapeshighlights major events of Clinton’s two terms, including wars in Bosnia and Kosovo, the failure of health care reform, peace initiatives on three continents, the anti-deficit crusade, and titanic political struggles from Whitewater to American history’s second presidential impeachment trial. Along the way, Clinton delivers colorful portraits of countless political figures and world leaders from Nelson Mandela to Pope John Paul II.These unprecedented White House dialogues will become a staple of presidential scholarship. Branch’s masterly account opens a new window on a controversial era and Bill Clinton’s eventual place among our chief executives.

 Culture of Corruption by Michelle Malkin

In her shocking new book, Malkin goes where the mainstream media refuse to tread. She digs deep into the records of President Obama’s staff, revealing corrupt dealings, questionable pasts, and abuses of power throughout his administration.

Bridgewater by Valentine J. Brkich

 Before Lewis and Clark by Shirley Christian

Shortly after Meriweather Lewis reached St. Louis in 1803 to plan for his voyage to the Pacific with William Clark, he prepared his first packet of flora and fauna from west of the Mississippi and dispatched it to President Jefferson. The cuttings, which were later planted in Philadelphia and Virginia, were supplied by Lewis’s new French friend, Pierre Chouteau, who took them from a tree growing in the garden of his mansion. One of the best-known families in French America, the Chouteaus had guarded the gates to the West for generations and had built fortunes from fur trading, land speculation, finance, and railroads, and by supplying anything needed to survive in the region between the Mississippi River and the Rocky Mountains. Patrician in their origins, they nevertheless won the respect and allegiance of dozens of Indian tribes. From their St. Louis base, the Chouteaus conquered the more-than-two-thousand-mile length of the Missouri River, put down the first European roots at the future site of Kansas City and in present-day Oklahoma, and left their names and imprints on lands stretching to the Canadian border. Before Lewis and Clark: The French Dynasty that Ruled America’s Frontier is the extraordinary story of a wealthy, powerful, charming, and manipulative family, who dominated business and politics in the Louisiana Purchase territory before the famous Lewis and Clark expedition, and for decades afterward.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: