June 2010 Large Print

An Amish Gathering

Follow the lives of three Amish families through the Christmas season with this collection. In “A Miracle for Miriam,” Miriam must decide if she can give the man who broke her heart a second chance. Lydia is shocked when her first love returns to the Order in “A Choice to Forgive,” and in “One Child,” a baby’s birth changes the world of two Lancaster couples.

The Postmistress by Sarah Blake

Filled with stunning parallels to today’s world, “The Postmistress” is a sweeping novel about the loss of innocence of two extraordinary women–and of two countries torn apart by war.

Never Far From Home by Mary Ellis

Mary Ellis follows her captivating Widow’s Hope with a new story from the heart of Holmes County, Ohio. In Never Far From Home, fifteen-year-old Emma Miller finishes school, starts her own wool business, and is longing for someone to court. When the object of her affection is a handsome English sheep farmer, with a fast truck and modern methods, her deacon father, Simon, knows he has more than the farm alliance to worry about.Emma isn’t the only one with longings in Holmes County. Her aunt Hannah wants a baby and her uncle Seth hopes he’ll reap financial rewards when he takes a risk with his harvest. But are these the dreams God has for this Amish family? With engaging interactions and thoughtful characters, Ellis weaves a story about waiting for God’s timing and discovering that the dreams planted close to home can grow a lasting harvest of hope and love.

The Gift by Julie Garwood

Publisher WeeklyThis bland romance, which borders on formulaic, recycles a few elements from Garwood’s earlier novel Guardian Angel . In 1802, in an attempt to bring peace between two warring families, the king arranges a marriage between the 14-year-old Nathanialsp ok Baker, marquess of St. James, and Lady Sara Winchester, who is four. Fourteen years later and now a pirate, Nathan wishes to claim his bride–and the property that comes with her–but the Winchesters aren’t cooperating. Nathan decides to indulge in a “clean, uncomplicated kidnapping” and spirits his wife out of England on one of his ships. In fact Sara, long infatuated with her absent, mysterious husband, settles into life at sea quite cheerfully, enlivening the voyage by accidentally destroying a couple of sails, giving the crew food poisoning and setting the vessel on fire. Despite it all, her determined affection for and faith in Nathan and his crew gradually wins her a place in their crusty, seafaring souls and a loyalty that is tested when, on their return to London, Sara’s father threatens to expose an old scandal that could ruin the St. James name. (Jan.)

The Irresistible Henry House by Lisa Grunwald

In mid-20th-century America, a home economics program at a prominent university uses real babies to teach mothering skills. For a young man raised in these unlikely circumstances, finding real love and learning to trust will prove to be the work of a lifetime.

Town in a Blueberry Jam by B.B. Haywood

“A Candy Holliday murder mystery.”

The God of the Hive by Laurie King

In the mesmerizing, powerful conclusion to the blockbuster hit “The Language of Bees,” Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes are each on the trail of exposing a ruthless villain. Will being apart help them solve a devilishly difficult mystery, or make them easier targets?

Imperfect Birds by Ann Lamott

The bestselling author of “Blue Shoe, Grace (Eventually),” and “Operating Instructions” returns with her most honest and heartrending novel yet, in which she explores the human quest for connection and salvation, love and family.

The Telling by Beverly Lewis

Lettie Byler continues her private quest to find the missing piece of her life. As clues take her from state to state, Lettie is increasingly torn between the family she has left behind and the yearning for her long-lost child.

Every Day in Tuscany by Frances Mayes

In this sequel to her “New York Times” bestsellers “Under the Tuscan Sun” and “Bella Tuscany,” the celebrated bard of Tuscany (“New York Times”) lyrically chronicles her continuing, two decades-long love affair with the region’s people, art, cuisine, and lifestyle.

Burning Lamp by Amanda Quick

In this second novel of the Dreamlight Trilogy from “New York Times”-bestselling author Quick, psychic power and passion collide as a legendary curse comes to fruition. Quick deftly distills sexy romance and deadly intrigue.–“Chicago Tribune.”

Spoken From the Heart by Laura Bush

In this brave, beautiful, and deeply personal memoir, Laura Bush, one of our most beloved and private first ladies, tells her own extraordinary story.nbsp;Born in the boom-and-bust oil town of Midland, Texas, Laura Welch grew up as an only child in a family that lost three babies to miscarriage or infant death. She vividly evokes Midland’s brash, rugged culture, her close relationship with her father, and the bonds of early friendships that sustain her to this day. For the first time, in heart-wrenching detail, she writes about the devastating high school car accident that left her friend Mike Douglas dead and about her decades of unspoken grief.When Laura Welch first left West Texas in 1964, she never imagined that her journey would lead her to the world stage and the White House. After graduating from Southern Methodist University in 1968, in the thick of student rebellions across the country and at the dawn of the women’s movement, she became an elementary school teacher, working in inner-city schools, then trained to be a librarian. At age thirty, she met George W. Bush, whom she had last passed in the hallway in seventh grade. Three months later, “the old maid of Midland married Midland’s most eligible bachelor.” With rare intimacy and candor, Laura Bush writes about her early married life as she was thrust into one of America’s most prominent political families, as well as her deep longing for children and her husband’s decision to give up drinking. By 1993, she found herself in the full glare of the political spotlight. But just as her husband won the Texas governorship in a stunning upset victory, her father, Harold Welch, was dying in Midland.In 2001, after one of the closest elections in American history, Laura Bush moved into the White House. Here she captures presidential life in the harrowing days and weeks after 9/11, when fighter-jet cover echoed through the walls and security scares sent the family to an underground shelter. She writes openly about the White House during wartime, the withering and relentless media spotlight, and the transformation of her role as she began to understand the power of the first lady. One of the first U.S. officials to visit war-torn Afghanistan, she also reached out to disease-stricken African nations and tirelessly advocated for women in the Middle East and dissidents in Burma. She championed programs to get kids out of gangs and to stop urban violence. And she was a major force in rebuilding Gulf Coast schools and libraries post-Katrina. Movingly, she writes of her visits with U.S. troops and their loved ones, and of her empathy for and immense gratitude to military families.With deft humor and a sharp eye, Laura Bush lifts the curtain on what really happens inside the White House, from presidential finances to the 175-year-old tradition of separate bedrooms for presidents and their wives to the antics of some White House guests and even a few members of Congress. She writes with honesty and eloquence about her family, her public triumphs, and her personal tribulations. Laura Bush’s compassion, her sense of humor, her grace, and her uncommon willingness to bare her heart make this story revelatory, beautifully rendered, and unlike any other first lady’s memoir ever written.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: