March 2011 Large Print

Promise Canyon by Robyn Carr

Carr’s 11th Virgin River novel (after 2010’s Moonlight Road) reads less like a story and more like a history book. Chapters of background lead to more chapters about horse colic, the characteristics of hoarders, and posttraumatic stress. Interesting characters pop up, but aren’t really part of the story. And somewhere in there is the rather sweet tale of Clay Tahoma and Lilly Yazhi. Clay, a 34-year-old Navajo veterinarian, moves to Virgin River from Los Angeles after a failed marriage; Lilly, 27 and Hopi, has lived in the tiny Northern California town most of her life. The two bond over the rehabilitation of two troubled horses. There’s a misunderstanding or two, and old hurts are aired at length, but this is more of a look through a window or a long gossip over coffee than a tightly plotted narrative. (Jan.) Publisher’s Weekly(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC.

The Sentry by Robert Crais

Dru Rayne and her uncle fled to L.A. after Hurricane Katrina; now they face a different danger. When Joe Pike witnesses Dru’s uncle beaten by a protection gang, he offers his help, but neither of them wants it. Pike and Elvis Cole soon learn that Dru and her uncle are not who they seem.

The Scent of Jasmine by Jude Devereaux

Freedom by Jonathan Franzen

The idyllic lives of civic-minded environmentalists Patty and Walter Berglund come into question when their son moves in with aggressive Republican neighbors, green lawyer Walter takes a job in the coal industry, and go-getter Patty becomes increasingly unstable and enraged.

Fatal Error by Judith Jance

When Brenda Riley, a colleague from Ali’s old news broadcasting days in California, shows up in town with an alcohol problem and an unlikely story about a missing fiancé, Ali reluctantly agrees to help. The man posing as Brenda’s fiancé is revealed to be Richard Lowensdale, a cyber-sociopath who has left a trail of broken hearts in his virtual wake. When he is viciously murdered, the police soon focus their investigation on Brenda.

A Cup of Friendship by Deborah Rodriguez

Sunny is an expat in Kabul who blissfully runs a coffee shop for other Americans in the country. When Yazmina, a pregnant young woman from a nearby village, is kidnapped and later abandoned near the coffee shop, Sunny instinctively comes to her aid. Candace, a wealthy American, also pitches in, while Isabel, a journalist, chronicles Yazmina’s woe. Meanwhile, Halajan, a local mother, is reeling from a forbidden love affair.

Clara and Mr. Tiffany by Susan Vreeland

It’s 1893, and at the Chicago World’s Fair, Louis Comfort Tiffany makes his debut with a luminous exhibition of innovative stained-glass windows, which he hopes will honor his family business and earn him a place on the international artistic stage. But behind the scenes in his New York studio is the head of his women’s division –freethinking Clara Driscoll. Publicly unrecognized by Tifanny, Clara conceives of and designs nearly all of the iconic leaded-glass lamps for which he is long remembered.

Nonfiction

29 Gifts: how a month of giving can change your life

An insightful story and memoir of the author’s life changes as she embraces and reflects on the naturally reciprocal process of giving and receiving. By day 29, not only had her health and happiness improved, but she had created a worldwide giving movement.

Little Princes: one man’s promise to bring home the lost children of Nepal

Conor Grennan volunteered in Nepal at the Little Princes Children’s Home in the village of Godawari in 2004. He would eventually return to Nepal to launch Next Generation Nepal (NGN), a nonprofit organization dedicated to reconnecting trafficked children with their families in postwar Nepal.

 

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