May 2011 Nonfiction

Computer Science, Information and General Works

 Final Jeopardy: man vs. machine and the quest to know everything

Technology journalist Baker reveals the story behind Watson, the IBM computer designed specifically to compete in the television quiz show Jeopardy! against some of the show’s greatest champions. The nature of the show, with puns and other forms of wordplay complicating the task of recalling the wide range of knowledge prompted by Jeopardy!’s “answers,” posed a significant challenge in artificial intelligence design, in some ways a far more subtle challenge than that faced by IBM’s chess-playing computer, Deep Blue. Baker discusses the people behind the program, the origins and progress of the program, the computing and artificial intelligence issues raised, and related topics. (Following publication, Watson handily trounced former Jeopardy! champions Ken Jennings and Brad Rutter in the televised challenge.) Annotation ©2011 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

 The Information: a history, a theory, a flood

James Gleick, the author of the best sellers Chaos and Genius, now brings us a work just as astonishing and masterly: a revelatory chronicle and meditation that shows how information has become the modern era’s defining quality – the blood, the fuel, the vital principle of our world. The story of information begins in a time profoundly unlike our own, when every thought and utterance vanishes as soon as it is born. From the invention of scripts and alphabets to the long-misunderstood talking drums of Africa, Gleick tells the story of information technologies that changed the very nature of human consciousness. He provides portraits of the key figures contributing to the inexorable development of our modern understanding of information: Charles Babbage, the idiosyncratic inventor of the first great mechanical computer; Ada Byron, the brilliant and doomed daughter of the poet, who became the first true programmer; pivotal figures like Samuel Morse and Alan Turing; and Claude Shannon, the creator of information theory itself. And then the information age arrives. Citizens of this world become experts willy-nilly: aficionados of bits and bytes. And we sometimes feel we are drowning, swept by a deluge of signs and signals, news and images, blogs and tweets. The Information is the story of how we got here and where we are heading.

Philosophy and Psychology

 Change Anything: the new science of personal success

A stunning new approach to how individuals can not only change their lives for the better in the workplace, but also their lives away from the office, including (but not limited to) finding ways to improve one’s working relationship with others, one’s overall health, outlook on life, and so on. Based upon the latest research in a number of psychological and medical fields, the authors of CHANGE ANYTHINGwill show that traditional will-power is not necessarily the answer to these strivings, that people are affected in their behaviors by far more subtle influences. CHANGE ANYTHINGshows how individuals can come to understand these powerful and influential forces, and how to put these forces to work in a positive manner that brings real and meaningful results. The authors present an array of everyday examples that will change and truly empower you to reexamine the way you go about your business and life.

 Two Kisses for Maddy: a memoir of loss and love

Matt and Liz Logelin were high school sweethearts. After years of long-distance dating, the pair finally settled together in Los Angeles, and they had it all: a perfect marriage, a gorgeous new home, and a baby girl on the way. Liz’s pregnancy was rocky, but they welcomed Madeline, beautiful and healthy, into the world on March 24, 2008. Just twenty-seven hours later, Liz suffered a pulmonary embolism and died instantly, without ever holding the daughter whose arrival she had so eagerly awaited. Though confronted with devastating grief and the responsibilities of a new and single father, Matt did not surrender to devastation; he chose to keep moving forward– to make a life for Maddy. In this memoir, Matt shares bittersweet and often humorous anecdotes of his courtship and marriage to Liz; of relying on his newborn daughter for the support that she unknowingly provided; and of the extraordinary online community of strangers who have become his friends. In honoring Liz’s legacy, heartache has become solace. This intimate retelling of one year marked by tremendous highs and lows offers something to any reader who has experienced grief and has sought the courage to live again.

 The Truth About Grief: the myth of  its five stages and the new science of loss

InThe Truth About Grief, Ruth Davis Konigsberg shows how the five stages were based on no science but nonetheless became national myth. She explains that current research paints a completely different picture of how we actually grieve. It turns out people are pretty well programmed to get over loss. Grieving should not be a strictly regimented process, she argues; nor is the best remedy for pain always to examine it or express it at great length. The strength of Konigsberg’s message is its liberating force: there is no manual to grieving; you can do it freestyle.

 The Bond: our kinship with animals, our call to defend them

Pacelle, president and CEO of the Humane Society, offers an insightful and engaging look at our relationship with animals–what they have taught us, how they are integral to our survival, how we are threatening their existence, and how we can find balance and sustainability.

Religion

  Chicken Soup for the Soul: a book of miracles

These 101 true stories of healing, divine intervention, and answered prayers prove that God is alive and very active in the world today, and working miracles. Regular people share their personal stories of God’s Divine intervention and healing power.

 Jesus of Nazareth. Part Two. Holy Week: from the entrance into Jerusalem to the Resurrection

For Christians, Jesus of Nazareth is the Son of God, who died for the sins of the world, and who rose from the dead in triumph over sin and death. For non-Christians, he is almost anything else–a myth, a political revolutionary, a prophet whose teaching was misunderstood or distorted by his followers. Jesus of Nazareth is the Son of God, and no myth, revolutionary, or misunderstood prophet, insists Benedict XVI. He thinks that the best of historical scholarship, while it can’t “prove” Jesus is the Son of God, certainly doesn’t disprove it. Indeed, Benedict maintains that the evidence, fairly considered, brings us face-to-face with the challenge of Jesus–a real man who taught and acted in ways that were tantamount to claims of divine authority, claims not easily dismissed as lunacy or deception. Benedict XVI presents this challenge in his new book, Jesus of Nazareth: Holy Week: From the Entrance into Jerusalem to the Resurrection, the sequel volume to Jesus of Nazareth: From the Baptism in the Jordan to the Transfiguration. Why was Jesus rejected by the religious leaders of his day? Who was responsible for his death? Did he establish a Church to carry on his work? How did Jesus view his suffering and death? How should we? And, most importantly, did Jesus really rise from the dead and what does his resurrection mean? The story of Jesus raises many crucial questions. Benedict brings to his study the vast learning of a brilliant scholar, the passionate searching of a great mind, and the deep compassion of a pastor’s heart. In the end, he dares readers to grapple with the meaning of Jesus’ life, teaching, death, and resurrection.

Social Sciences

 Sideways on a Scooter: life and love in India

When twentysomething reporter Miranda Kennedy leaves her job in New York City and travels to India with no employment prospects, she longs to immerse herself in the turmoil and excitement of a rapidly developing country. What she quickly learns in Delhi about renting an apartment as a single woman-it’s next to impossible-and the proper way for women in India to ride scooters-perched sideways-are early signs that life here is less Westernized than she’d counted on. Living in Delhi for more than five years, and finding a city pulsing with possibility and hope, Kennedy experiences friendships, love affairs, and losses that open a window onto the opaque world of Indian politics and culture-and alter her own attitudes about everything from food and clothes to marriage and family. Along the way, Kennedy is drawn into the lives of several Indian women, including her charismatic friend Geeta-a self-described “modern girl” who attempts to squeeze herself into the traditional role of wife and mother; Radha, a proud Brahmin widow who denies herself simple pleasures in order to live by high-caste Hindu principles; and Parvati, who defiantly chain-smokes and drinks whiskey, yet feels compelled to keep her boyfriend a secret from her family.In her effort to understand the hopes and dreams that motivate her new friends, Kennedy peels back India’s globalized image as a land of call centers and fast-food chains and finds an ancient place where, in many ways, women’s lives have scarcely changed for centuries. Incisive, witty, and written with a keen eye for the lush vibrancy of the country that Kennedy comes to love, Sideways on a Scooter is both a remarkable memoir and a cultural revelation.

 The Social Animal: the hidden sources of love, character and achievement

New York Times columnist Brooks (Bobos in Paradise) raids Malcolm Gladwell’s pop psychology turf in a wobbly treatise on brain science, human nature, and public policy. Essentially a satirical novel interleaved with disquisitions on mirror neurons and behavioral economics, the narrative chronicles the life cycle of a fictional couple-Harold, a historian working at a think tank, and Erica, a Chinese-Chicana cable-TV executive-as a case study of the nonrational roots of social behaviors, from mating and shopping to voting. Their story lets Brooks mock the affluent and trendy while advancing soft neoconservative themes: that genetically ingrained emotions and biases trump reason; that social problems require cultural remedies (charter schools, not welfare payments); that the class divide is about intelligence, deportment, and taste, not money or power. Brooks is an engaging guide to the “cognitive revolution” in psychology, but what he shows us amounts mainly to restating platitudes. (Women like men with money, we learn, while men like women with breasts.) His attempt to inflate recent research on neural mechanisms into a grand worldview yields little except buzz concepts-“society is a layering of networks”-no more persuasive than the rationalist dogmas he derides.

 The Invisible Line: three American families and the secret journey from black to white

Many persons of African American heritage but white appearance crossed the color line at times when racial classification had very real and harsh implications. Legal scholar Sharfstein chronicles the lives of three such families who made the transition from black to white during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The Gibsons started as landowners in South Carolina’s backcountry and became wealthy slaveholders and part of the southern elite, producing a senator and a major figure in American commerce. The Spencers owned farmland in eastern Kentucky and eventually Appalachia, scratching out a life as part of an isolated community, in which families were loathe to set hard racial definitions until coal mining and outsiders pressed the broader social mores of the U.S. The Walls gravitated to post-Civil War Washington, DC, and became part of the black elite that challenged racial restrictions until they could no longer resist the temptation to take advantage of the escape their fair skin afforded them. Drawing on archival material, Sharfstein constructs an absorbing history, demonstrating the fluidity and arbitrariness of racial classification.–Bush, Vanessa Copyright 2010 Booklist

 Message from an Unknown Chinese Mother: stories of loss and love

Following her internationally bestselling book  The Good Women of China,  Xinran has written one of the most powerful accounts of the lives of Chinese women. Her searing stories of mothers who have been driven to abandon their daughters or give them up for adoption is a masterful and significant work of literary reportage and oral history. Xinran has gained entrance to the most pained, secret chambers in the hearts of Chinese mothers—students, successful businesswomen, midwives, peasants—who have given up their daughters. Whether as a consequence of the single-child policy, destructive age-old traditions, or hideous economic necessity, these women had to give up their daughters for adoption; others even had to watch as their baby daughters were taken away at birth and drowned. Xinran beautifully portrays the “extra-birth guerrillas” who travel the roads and the railways, evading the system, trying to hold on to more than one baby; naive young girl students who have made life-wrecking mistakes; the “pebble mother” on the banks of the Yangzte River still looking into the depths for her stolen daughter; peasant women rejected by their families because they can’t produce a male heir; and Little Snow, the orphaned baby fostered by Xinran but confiscated by the state. For parents of adopted Chinese children and for the children themselves, this is an indispensable, powerful, and intensely moving book. Message from an Unknown Chinese Mother is powered by love and by heartbreak and will stay with readers long after they have turned the final page.

 Liberty Defined: 50 essential issues that affect our freedom

The term “Liberty” is so commonly used in our country that it has become a mere clich#xE9;. But do we know what it means? What it promises? How it factors into our daily lives? And most importantly, can we recognize tyranny when it is sold to us disguised as a form of liberty? Dr. Paul writes that to believe in liberty is not to believe in any particular social and economic outcome. It is to trust in the spontaneous order that emerges when the state does not intervene in human volition and human cooperation. It permits people to work out their problems for themselves, build lives for themselves, take risks and accept responsibility for the results, and make their own decisions. It is the seed of America. This is a comprehensive guide to Dr. Paul’s position on fifty of the most important issues of our times, from Abortion to Zionism. Accessible, easy to digest, and fearless in its discussion of controversial topics, LIBERTY DEFINED sheds new light on a word that is losing its shape.

 The Company We Keep: a husband-and-wife true-life spy story

Robert Baer was known inside the CIA as perhaps the best operative working the Middle East. Over several decades he served everywhere from Iraq to New Delhi and racked up such an impressive list of accomplishments that he was eventually awarded the Career Intelligence Medal. But if his career was everything a spy might aspire to, his personal life was a brutal illustration of everything a spy is asked to sacrifice. Bob had few enduring non-work friendships, only contacts and acquaintances. His prolonged absences destroyed his marriage, and he felt intense guilt at spending so little time with his children. Sworn to secrecy and constantly driven by ulterior motives, he was a man apart wherever he went. Dayna Williamson thought of herself as just an ordinary California girl — admittedly one born into a comfortable lifestyle. But she was always looking to get closer to the edge. When she joined the CIA, she was initially tasked with Agency background checks, but the attractive Berkeley graduate quickly distinguished herself as someone who could thrive in the field, and she was eventually assigned to Protective Operations training where she learned to handle weapons and explosives and conduct high-speed escape and evasion. Tapped to serve in some of the world’s most dangerous places, she discovered an inner strength and resourcefulness she’d never known — but she also came to see that the spy life exacts a heavy toll. Her marriage crumbled, her parents grew distant, and she lost touch with friends who’d once meant everything to her. When Bob and Dayna met on a mission in Sarajevo, it wasn’t love at first sight. They were both too jaded for that. But there was something there, a spark. And as the danger escalated and their affection for each other grew, they realized it was time to leave the Company, to somehow rediscover the people they’d once been. As worldly as both were, the couple didn’t realize at first that turning in their Agency I.D. cards would not be enough to put their covert past behind. The fact was, their clandestine relationships remained. Living as civilians in conflict-ridden Beirut, they fielded assassination proposals, met with Arab sheiks, wily oil tycoons, terrorists, and assorted outlaws and came perilously close to dying. But even then they couldn’t know that their most formidable challenge lay ahead. Simultaneously a trip deep down the intelligence rabbit hole one that shows how the game actually works, including the compromises it asks of those who play by its rules — and a portrait of two people trying to regain a normal life, The Company We Keep is a masterly depiction of the real world of shadows.

 In the Plex: how Google works, thinks and shapes our lives

It is best known for its search engine, but as Steven Levy explains, Google’s ambitions go far beyond internet searching. It has moved into mobile phones, computer operating systems, television, and is the most powerful company in the advertising business. Its advertising business produces revenues so substantial that the company has no difficulty funding all its other projects. The company has an unusual corporate culture, which Levy describes. The founders are often seen on Rollerblades, there are exercise breaks for employees and certain foods are either free or minimally priced. There is simultaneously an atmosphere of seriousness and playfulness. What role this corporate culture plays in the company’s success is one question that In the Plex will address. For example, every Googler has 20% time — employees are allowed to spend 20% of their time on projects of their own devising. No manager can prevent this. Some successful corporate businesses have come from 20% time. Levy provides the background on Google’s decision to enter the Chinese market, a decision that was controversial within the company at the time and which has recently made news as Google threatens to withdraw from China. He explains how “cloud computing” is the next frontier for Google, and he takes the reader into product development, including products that should be reaching market around the time the book is published. He explains what Google is doing to counter the rise of social networks such as Facebook (Google has its own social network), real-time competitors such as Twitter, and the looming risk of government regulation because of its dominance of the internet.

 A Thousand Times More Fair: what Shakespeare’s plays teach us about justice

Yoshino, celebrated law professor and author of the acclaimed memoir “Covering,” offers a fresh reading of a dozen seminal Shakespeare plays to show how they provide parables of justice relevant to our lives today.

 Crazy U: one dad’s crash course on getting his kid into college

The cutthroat competition to get into the perfect college can drive students to the brink of madness and push their parents over the edge—and bury them in an avalanche of books that claim to hold the secret of success. Don’t worry:  Crazy U is not one of those books. It is instead a disarmingly candid and hilariously subversive chronicle of the journey that millions of parents and their children undertake each year—a journey through the surreal rituals of college admissions. It’s a rollicking ride from the man Christopher Buckley has called “my all-time favorite writer.”  Pummeled by peers, creeped out by counselors, and addled by advice books, Andrew Ferguson has come to believe that a single misstep could cost his son a shot at a happy and fulfilling future. He feels the pressure to get it right from the moment the first color brochures land in his mailbox, sent from colleges soliciting customers as though they were sailors come to port. First is a visit with the most sought-after, most expensive—and surely most intimidating—private college consultant in the nation. Then come the steps familiar to parents and their college-bound children, seen through a gimlet eye: a session with a distracted high school counselor, preparations for the SAT and an immersion in its mysteries, unhelpful help from essay coaches and admissions directors, endless campus tours, and finally, as spring arrives, the waiting, waiting, waiting for the envelope that bears news of the future. Meanwhile, Ferguson passes on the tips he’s picked up during their crash course. (Tip number 36: Don’t apply for financial aid after midnight.) He provides a pocket history of higher education in America, recounts the college ranking wars, and casts light on the obscure and not-terribly-seemly world of higher-education marketing. And he dares to raise the question that no one (until now) has been able to answer: Why on earth does it all cost so much? Along the way, something unexpected begins to happen: a new relationship grows between father and son, built from humor, loyalty, and (yes) more than a little shared anxiety. For all its tips and trials,  Crazy U is also a story about family. It turns out that the quiet boy who pretends not to be worried about college has lots to teach his father—about what matters in life, about trusting your instincts, about finding your own way.

 Zombies!: an illustrated history of the undead

Celebrates zombie pop culture that has evolved since “Night of the Living Dead,” tracing early mythological origins in African folklore and Haitian voodoo as well as modern incarnations in film, literature, and video gaming.

Science (including mathematics)

 The Clockwork Universe: Isaac Newton, the Royal Society and the birth of the modern world

A”New York Times”-bestselling author presents the true story of a pivotal moment in modern history when a group of strange, tormented geniuses–Isaac Newton chief among them–invented science and remade our understanding of the world.

Technology and Applied Science

 Thrive: the vegan nutrition guide to optimal performance in sports and life

The thrive diet is a long-term eating plan to help all athletes (professional or not) develop a lean body, sharp mind, and everlasting energy. As one of the few professional athletes on a plant-based diet, Brendan Brazier researched and developed this easy-to-follow program to enhance his performance as an elite endurance competitor.  Brazier clearly describes the benefits of nutrient-rich foods in their natural state versus processed foods, and how to choose nutritionally efficient, stress-busting whole foods for maximum energy and health. Featuring a 12-week meal plan, over 100 allergen-free recipes with raw food options including recipes for energy gels, sport drinks, and recovery foods and a complementary exercise plan, The Thrive Diet, an authoritative guide to outstanding performance” (Neal D. Barnard, M.D., Physician’s Committee for Responsible Medicine).

 The New Abs Diet for Women

Explains how women can lose pounds quickly and dramatically reshape their bodies, while maintaining the principles of a safe, healthy, and nutritionally balanced diet, covering such topics as preventing osteoporosis and managing menopausal symptoms.

 Be Different: adventures of a free-range Aspergian with practical advice for Aspergians, misfits, families and teachers

I believe those of us with Asperger’s are here for a reason, and we have much to offer. This book will help you bring out those gifts. In his bestselling memoir, Look Me in the Eye, John Elder Robison described growing up with Asperger’s syndrome at a time when the diagnosis didn’t exist. He was intelligent but socially isolated; his talents won him jobs with toy makers and rock bands but did little to endear him to authority figures and classmates, who were put off by his inclination to blurt out non sequiturs and avoid eye contact. By the time he was diagnosed at age forty, John had already developed a myriad of coping strategies that helped him achieve a seemingly normal, even highly successful, life. In Be Different, Robison shares a new batch of endearing stories about his childhood, adolescence, and young adult years, giving the reader a rare window into the Aspergian mind. In each story, he offers practical advice-for Aspergians and indeed for anyone who feels different-on how to improve the weak communication and social skills that keep so many people from taking full advantage of their often remarkable gifts. With his trademark honesty and unapologetic eccentricity, Robison addresses questions like: ” How to read others and follow their behaviors when in uncertain social situations ” Why manners matter ” How to harness your powers of concentration to master difficult skills ” How to deal with bullies ” When to make an effort to fit in, and when to embrace eccentricity ” How to identify special gifts and use them to your advantage Every person, Aspergian or not, has something unique to offer the world, and every person has the capacity to create strong, loving bonds with their friends and family. Be Different will help readers and those they love find their path to success.

 The Dark Side of Innocence: growing up bipolar

From the “New York Times”-bestselling author of “Manic: A Memoir” comes a gripping and eloquent account of the awakening and unfolding of Cheney’s bipolar disorder.

 The Joy of Hobby Farming: grow food, raise animals and enjoy a sustainable life

When the farm is a lifestyle, not just a way to earn a living, that s hobby farming. Most of us want to live a sustainable life in which we protect the land and keep it safe from development and overproduction. But we can take this a step further by learning how to grow and savor what we can produce ourselves while still maintaining an alternative career to fund this passion. Michael and Audrey Levatino here share how to: Grow your own food. Raise chickens, horses, llamas, bees, and more. Practice being (a little) off the grid. Sell the bounty in your local community. Balance a professional career with a rural lifestyle. The Joy of Hobby Farming is a book that will excite armchair farmers and inspire any do-it-yourselfer.

 Your Farm in the City: an urban dweller’s guide to growing food and raising livestock

The most complete book on urban farming, “Your Farm in the City” covers everything from growing organic produce and raising chickens, to running a small farm on a city lot or in a suburban backyard.

 Johnny  Appleseed: the man, the myth, the American story

This portrait of Johnny Appleseed restores the flesh-and-blood man beneath the many myths. It captures the boldness of an iconic American life and the sadness of his last years, as the frontier marched past him, ever westward. And it shows how death liberated the legend and made of Johnny a barometer of the nation¿s feelings about its own heroic past and the supposed Eden it once had been. It is a book that does for America¿s inner frontier what Stephen Ambrose¿s Undaunted Courage did for its western one. No American folk hero–not Davy Crockett, not even Daniel Boone–is better known than Johnny Appleseed, and none has become more trapped in his own legends. The fact is, John Chapman–the historical Johnny Appleseed–might well be the best-known figure from our national past about whom most people know almost nothing real at all. One early historian called Chapman “the oddest character in all our history,” and not without cause. Chapman was an animal whisperer, a vegetarian in a raw country where it was far easier to kill game than grow a crop, a pacifist in a place ruled by gun, knife, and fist. Some settlers considered Chapman a New World saint. Others thought he had been kicked in the head by a horse. And yet he was welcomed almost everywhere, and stories about him floated from cabin to cabin, village to village, just as he did. As eccentric as he was, John Chapman was also very much a man of his times: a land speculator and pioneer nurseryman with an uncanny sense for where settlement was moving next, and an evangelist for the Church of the New Jerusalem on a frontier alive with religious fervor. His story is equally America¿s story at the birth of the nation. In this tale of the wilderness and its taming, author Howard Means explores how our national past gets mythologized and hired out. Mostly, though, this is the story of two men, one real and one invented; of the times they lived through, the ties that link them, and the gulf that separates them; of the uses to which both have been put; and of what that tells us about ourselves, then and now.

 Home Dairy with Ashley English: all you need to know to make cheese, yogurt, butter & more

English provides a feast of information for dairy-loving foodies. She guides readers through all the essentials they need to know to make cheese, yogurt, butter, and more. Includes recipes for 10 seasonal dishes.

 Planet Home: conscious choices for cleaning and greening the world you care about most

From Seventh Generation co-founder and chairman Hollender comes an indispensable reference for anyone who wants to maintain a healthy home and a healthy world.

Taste of Home’s Contest Winning Annual Recipes

 Cooking Light Comfort Food: home-cooked, delicious classics made light

“Comfort Food” is “Cooking Light’s” first collection of more than 200 classiccomfort food recipes that fit into a balanced diet–and no one will know theyare light. There is something for everyone in this warm, cozy cookbook that’schock-full of comforting recipes.

 If It Makes You Healthy: more than 100 delicious recipes inspired by the seasons

Providing a full menu of approximately 125 recipes grouped seasonally, this cookbook is filled with easy and flavorful recipes anyone can make. Along the way, Crow opens up about touring and home life, with stories about her childhood, her early years as a backup singer, and her eventual stardom.

 Now Eat This! Diet

On the heels of the bestselling success of his low-calorie Now Eat This! cookbook, Rocco Dispirito expands his brand with a weight-loss program guaranteed to produce maximum results with minimum effort. Award-winning celebrity chef Rocco DiSpirito changed his life and his health-without giving up the foods he loves or the flavor. He has lost more than 20 pounds, participated in dozens of triathlons, and-after an inspirational role as a guest chef on The Biggest Loser- changed his own diet and the caloric content of classic dishes on a larger scale. In THE NOW EAT THIS! DIET, complete with a foreword by Dr. Mehmet Oz, DiSpirito offers readers a revolutionary 2-week program for dropping 10 pounds quickly, with little effort, no deprivation, and while still eating 6 meals a day and the dishes they crave, like mac & cheese, meatloaf, BBQ pork chops, and chocolate malted milk shakes. The secret: Rocco’s unique meal plans and his 75 recipes for breakfast, lunch, dinner, dessert, and snack time, all with zero bad carbs, zero bad fats, zero sugar, and maximum flavor. Now readers can eat more and weigh less-it’s never been so easy!

 Hungry Girl 300 Under 300: 300 breakfast, lunch and dinner dishes under 300 calories

It’s MEAL-MANIA, HG STYLE! This book features THREE HUNDRED satisfying and delicious recipes for full-on meals. Breakfast, lunch and dinner dishes, plus snazzy starters and sides, that contain less than 300 calories each! In addition to CROCK-POT recipes, FOIL PACKS, and other HG favorites, this book serves up more than SEVENTY-FIVE soon-to-be-famous HG TRIOS: three-ingredient combos that take easy to a whole new level! Included are…Bean ‘n Cheesy Soft Taco in an Egg Mug * PB&J Oatmeal Heaven * Creamy Crab Cakes Benedict * Classic Cheesesteak Salad * Dreamy Butternut Chicken Foil Pack * Burger-ific Mushroom Melt * Buffalo Chicken Wing Macaroni & Cheese * BLT Pizza * Big Apple Butternut Squash Soup * Loaded Bacon-Wrapped Hot Dogs … And more!

 Appetite for Reduction: 125 fast & filling low-fat vegan recipes

This is not your mother’s low-fat cookbook. There’s no foolish tricks, no bizarre concoctions, no chemicals, no frozen meals & no fake anything! Appetite for Reduction means cooking with real food, for real life. (Skimpy portions need not apply.)  In Appetite for Reduction, bestselling author and vegan chef Isa Chandra Moskowitz has created 125 delectable, nutritionally-balanced recipes for the foods you crave-lasagna, tacos, barbecue, curries, stews, and much more-and it’s all: Only 200 to 400 calories per serving; Plant-based and packed with nutrients; Low in saturated fat and sugar; high in fiber; Drop-dead delicious. You’ll also find lots of gluten-free and soy-free options, and best of all, dinner can be on the table in less than 30 minutes. So ditch those diet shakes. Skip that lemonade cleanse. And fight for your right to eat something satisfying! Now you can look better, feel better, and have more energy-for health at any size.

 Free For All Cooking: 150 easy gluten-free, allergy-friendly recipes that the whole family can enjoy

Gluten-free cooking expert Shepard offers 125 easy and uncompromisingly delicious recipes that are free of major allergen ingredients, including gluten, dairy, nuts, soy, eggs, and more.

 Weight Watchers New Complete Cookbook

Reflecting the most up-to-date program information from Weight Watchers, this revised edition includes more than 500 recipes, from essential basics like homemade sauces and salad dressings, to hearty breakfasts, light lunches, and frozen desserts.

 Sewing School: 21 sewing projects kids will love to make

Kids everywhere are in stitches . . . sewing stitches, that is. They are discovering the wonder and joy found in simple needle and thread. And while sewing offers an array of benefits for children it nurtures creativity and cognitive ability, refines coordination, boosts confidence, and is a skill they ll use their whole lives kids know that it s just plain fun. Sewing School authors Amie Plumley and Andria Lisle teach a sewing camp in Memphis, Tennessee, which has earned accolades from delighted children and parents. When families clamored for more, Plumley and Lisle launched a blog, sewingschool.blogspot.com, to rave reviews. Now, they ve channeled the best of their children s sewing projects into this lively, how-to sew book for ages five and up. Featuring 21 inspired projects for young sewers, Sewing School allows kids to create fabric masterpieces with minimal supervision. All projects have been kid-tested, most can be made using simple hand stitches, and all can be embellished with a personal touch, making them a terrific outlet for kids creativity. To further inspire young needle-crafters, the book is peppered with photos and quotes from real boys and girls who have participated in the authors sewing camp. Projects include items that children can hug (pillows, doll, blanket), hold (wallet, tote, drawstring pouch), give as gifts (coasters, glasses case, pot holder), and wear (sleep mask, hat, cuffs). Each project features step-by-step instructions written at a second-grade reading level, a close-up photo of every step, and a photo of the finished project. The book includes full-sized cutout patterns in a front pocket and instructions for how grownups can help.

 The Best Advice I Ever Got: lessons from extraordinary lives

What was the tipping point for Malcolm Gladwell? What unscripted event made Meryl Streep who she is? How did Mario Batali cook up his recipe for success? In this inspiration-packed book, Katie Couric reports from the front lines of the worlds of politics, entertainment, sports, philanthropy, the arts, and business distilling the ingenious, hard-won insights of leaders and visionaries, who tell us all how to take chances, follow our passions, cope with criticism, and, perhaps most important, commit to something greater than ourselves. Among the many voices to be heard here are financial guru Suze Orman on the benefits of doing what’s right, not what’s easy; director Steven Spielberg on listening rather than being listened to; quarterback Drew Brees on how his (literal) big break changed his life; and novelist Curtis Sittenfeld on the secrets of a great long-term relationship (she suggests marrying someone less neurotic than you). Along the way, Couric reflects on the good advice and the missteps that have guided her from her early days as a desk assistant at ABC to her groundbreaking role as the first female anchor of the CBS Evening News. She reveals how the words of Thomas Jefferson helped her deal with her husband’s tragic death from cancer, and what encouraged her to leave the security of NBC’s Today show for a new adventure at CBS. Delightful, empowering, and moving, The Best Advice I Ever Got is the perfect book for anyone who is thinking about the future, contemplating taking a risk, or daring to make a leap into the great unknown. This book is for all of us, young or old, who want to see how today’s best and brightest got it right, got it wrong, and came out on top.

 A Place of Yes: 10 rules for getting everything you want out of life

The New York Times bestselling author of Naturally Thin and The Skinnygirl Dish, Bethenny Frankel takes us on an empowering journey to A Place of Yes. Bethenny Frankel’s no-nonsense, tell-it-like-it-is personality won over countless fans, and made her a nationally bestselling author and the star of her own hit Bravo show Bethenny Getting Married? Now Bethenny opens up and shares the obstacles she overcame and the great success she has enjoyed while discovering how to approach life from A Place of Yes. Bethenny’s path was not always clear as she overcame a difficult childhood, failed relationships, entrepreneurial efforts that never quite got off the ground, and lifelong money struggles. To deal with these challenges, Bethenny developed ten rules for pursuing her goals with authenticity and drive, including: Find Your Truth: Dig deep inside and figure out what is authentic for you, not anybody else. Act on It: You don’t have to have a master plan. But unless you do something, you’ve done nothing. Everything’s Your Business: Treat every job, person, and experience as if it could lead to your next big opportunity. Own It: If you do it, say it, think it – then own it. Stand up for yourself and fully acknowledge who you really are. Each rule is illustrated with compelling, sometimes funny, sometimes outrageous examples that are pure Bethenny. It’s easy to say “no”, to say “I can’t,” to expect the worst, and to doubt yourself. But your life can be better than “not bad” or “good enough.” It can be amazing. And by putting Bethenny’s rules together, you can use them to be more successful, more fulfilled, healthier, and happier than ever before.

 The 10 Habits of Happy Mothers: reclaiming our passion, purpose and sanity

The pressure on women today has pushed many American mothers to the breaking point. It feels as if  doing your best is never enough to please everyone, and the demands mothers place on themselves are both impossible and unrealistic. Now Meg Meeker, M.D., critically acclaimed author of  Strong Fathers, Strong Daughters,  puts her twenty-five years’ experience as a practicing pediatrician and counselor into a sound, sane approach to reshaping the frustrating, exhausting lives of so many moms.  Mothers are expected to do it all: raise superstar kids, look great, make good salaries, volunteer for everything, run errands, keep a perfect house, be the perfect wife. Single mothers often have even more demands-and less support. In this rallying cry for change, Dr. Meeker incorporates clinical data and her own experience raising four children to show why mothers suffer from the rising pressure to excel and the toll it takes on their emotional, physical, mental, and spiritual health. Too many mothers are increasingly lonely, anxious, depressed, and unhappy with themselves, refusing to let themselves off the hook. Here, Dr. Meeker has identified the 10 most positive habits of mothers who are healthy, happy, and fulfilled. The key is to embrace a new perspective and create real joy and purpose by utilizing such core habits as ” making friends with those who know the meaning of friendship”; ” finding out what money can buy (and what it cannot)”;  lightening the overload-and doing less more often”;  “discovering faith and learning how to trust it”;  “taking some alone time and reviving yourself.” Mothers, it’s time to view the unconditional trust that you see in your children’s eyes when they take your hand or find your face in a crowd as a mirror of your own wonder and worth. You are the light that shines in their lives, the beacon that guides them. By implementing the key strategies in Dr. Meeker’s book, you can be happy, hopeful, and a wonderful role model. You can teach your children to be the very best they can be-and isn’t that still the most precious reward of motherhood?

 Organize Now!: a week-by-week guide to simplify your space and your life

Find practical, straightforward advice and instruction presented in checklists that anyone can use and see immediate results in Organize Now! The revised edition will include a new section Organize Your Routines that contains four weeks on organizing different routines, morning, meal-time, nighttime and errands to help anyone who needs to get organized.

 Superbaby: 12 ways to give your child a head start in the first 3 years

The first three years of life are the most important for nurturing a child’s full potential: that’s when they start forming attachments, developing a sense of self, and learning to trust. During this time, there are critical windows of opportunity that parents can take advantage of-if they know how. In a dozen succinct yet information-packed chapters, award-winning columnist and professional therapist Dr. Jenn Berman gives parents the knowledge they need. Her enlightening sidebars, bulleted lists, and concrete, easy-to-use strategies will help parents raise happy, healthy babies who grow to be flourishing toddlers and successful adults.

Arts and Recreation

 American Eden: from Monticello to Central Park to our back yards

Graham presents a sweeping social history of our nation’s landscapes and the visionaries behind them, which offers an exciting new perspective–from the garden path–on the drama of American self-creation.

 World Atlas of Golf: the greatest courses and how they are played

he World Atlas of Golf irst published in 2006, it set the standard by taking a uniquely global view of the game and the architects of course design. Now, the paperback edition of the revised edition is finally available – with all the text, spectacular illustrations, and dazzling photographs that have made it one of the game’s most popular books. Put together by leading experts, this is a tribute to golf that every lover of the game will want to own…and every dad will want to receive on Father’s Day. From revered links, like St Andrews, to hidden gems, like Casa De Campo in the Dominican Republic, this beautifully designed and illustrated guide covers the seminal and most architecturally brilliant courses. Stunningly designed feature pages provide a thorough understanding of the golfing scene throughout the world. There are also maps showing locations of key clubs, plus sumptuous computer-generated illustrations of each course, filled with impressive detail, and “cutaways” of signature holes. Written by the world’s leading authorities on golf course architecture, The World Atlas of Golf paperback edition continues the tradition of this well-respected and best-selling title and is the only guide that any lover of the game will need. The greatest courses of the world are waiting to be explored!

 The Natural Navigator: a watchful explorer’s guide to a nearly forgotten skill

Adventurer and navigation expert Gooley blends science, myth, folklore, and the history of travel and exploration to make “The Natural Navigator” the essential guidebook to the ancient art of natural navigation.

Literature

 The Long Goodbye

From one of America’s foremost young literary voices, a transcendent portrait of the unbearable anguish of grief and the enduring power of familial love. “Meghan O’Rourke, a celebrated poet and critic, writes prose as if she was born to it first. Her memoir The Long Goodbye is emotionally acute, strikingly empathetic, thorough and unstinting intellectually, and of course elegantly wrought. But it’s above all a useful book, for life-the good bits and the sad ones, too.” -Richard Ford “Meghan O’Rourke has written a beautiful memoir about her loss of a truly irreplaceable mother-yes, it is sad, it is in fact heartrending, but it is many things more: courageous, inspiring, wonderfully intelligent and informed, and an intimate portrait of an American family as well.” -Joyce Carol Oates “Meghan O’Rourke is an extraordinary writer, and she offers precious gifts to readers in this powerful memoir. There is the gift of entering her family, with its vibrant characters and culture. There is the gift of her profound insights into the experience of grief, its grip and the diverse ways we struggle to reenter a world where joy is felt. But most of all, there is her gift of showing us how love prevails after even the most devastating loss.” -Jerome Groopman, M.D., Recanati Professor, Harvard Medical School, and author of The Anatomy of Hope and How Doctors Think What does it mean to mourn today, in a culture that has largely set aside rituals that acknowledge grief? After her mother died of cancer at the age of fifty-five, Meghan O’Rourke found that nothing had prepared her for the intensity of her sorrow. In the first anguished days, she began to create a record of her interior life as a mourner, trying to capture the paradox of grief-its monumental agony and microscopic intimacies-an endeavor that ultimately bloomed into a profound look at how caring for her mother during her illness changed and strengthened their bond. O’Rourke’s story is one of a life gone off the rails, of how watching her mother’s illness-and separating from her husband-left her fundamentally altered. But it is also one of resilience, as she observes her family persevere even in the face of immeasurable loss. With lyricism and unswerving candor, The Long Goodbye conveys the fleeting moments of joy that make up a life, and the way memory can lead us out of the jagged darkness of loss. Effortlessly blending research and reflection, the personal and the universal, it is not only an exceptional memoir, but a necessary one.

 The Wilder Life: my adventures in the lost world of Little House on the Prairie

For anyone who has ever wanted to step into the world of a favorite book, here is a pioneer pilgrimage, a tribute to Laura Ingalls Wilder, and a hilarious account of butter-churning obsession. Wendy McClure is on a quest to find the world of beloved Little House on the Prairie author Laura Ingalls Wilder-a fantastic realm of fiction, history, and places she’s never been to, yet somehow knows by heart. She retraces the pioneer journey of the Ingalls family- looking for the Big Woods among the medium trees in Wisconsin, wading in Plum Creek, and enduring a prairie hailstorm in South Dakota. She immerses herself in all things  Little House, and explores the story from fact to fiction, and from the TV shows to the annual summer pageants in Laura’s hometowns. Whether she’s churning butter in her apartment or sitting in a replica log cabin, McClure is always in pursuit of “the Laura experience.” Along the way she comes to understand how Wilder’s life and work have shaped our ideas about girlhood and the American West. The Wilder Life is a loving, irreverent, spirited tribute to a series of books that have inspired generations of American women. It is also an incredibly funny first-person account of obsessive reading, and a story about what happens when we reconnect with our childhood touchstones-and find that our old love has only deepened.

 This is a Book

From the renowned comedian, creator, star and executive producer/multiple title-holder of Comedy Central’s “Important Things with Demetri Martin” comes a bold, original, and rectangular kind of humor book.

History and Geography

 The 100 Best Affordable Vacations

Even in a weakened economy, research shows interest in travel is still strong and this book provides 100 great ways to satisfy your wanderlust without breaking the bank. Like the other books in this popular series,<i>The 100 Best Affordable Vacations to Enrich Your Life</i>features out of the ordinary opportunities. They will just be less expensive, with some even free! Vacation categories include Classic Americana; Learning Vacations; Wilderness Trips; and Mind, Body, and Soul themed getaways. With this mix, there are lots of creative ideas and appealing destinations for everybody, whatever their interests, schedule, or budget. This book also offers profiles of inspirational travelers, as well as fun, lively sidebars about off-season travel, how to be a traveler and not a tourist, and more.

 A Covert Affair: Julia Child and Paul Child in the OSS

Bestselling author Jennet Conant brings us a stunning account of Julia and Paul Child’s experiences as members of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) in the Far East during World War II and the tumultuous years when they were caught up in the McCarthy Red spy hunt in the 1950s and behaved with bravery and honor. It is the fascinating portrait of a group of idealistic men and women who were recruited by the citizen spy service, slapped into uniform, and dispatched to wage political warfare in remote outposts in Ceylon, India, and China. <p>The eager, inexperienced 6 foot 2 inch Julia springs to life in these pages, a gangly golf-playing California girl who had never been farther abroad than Tijuana. Single and thirty years old when she joined the staff of Colonel William Donovan, Julia volunteered to be part of the OSS’s ambitious mission to develop a secret intelligence network across Southeast Asia. Her first post took her to the mountaintop idyll of Kandy, the headquarters of Admiral Lord Louis Mountbatten, the supreme commander of combined operations. Julia reveled in the glamour and intrigue of her overseas assignment and lifealtering romance with the much older and more sophisticated Paul Child, who took her on trips into the jungle, introduced her to the joys of curry, and insisted on educating both her mind and palate. A painter drafted to build war rooms, Paul was a colorful, complex personality. Conant uses extracts from his letters in which his sharp eye and droll wit capture the day-to-day confusion, excitement, and improbability of being part of a cloak- and-dagger operation. When Julia and Paul were transferred to Kunming, a rugged outpost at the foot of the Burma Road, they witnessed the chaotic end of the war in China and the beginnings of the Communist revolution that would shake the world.  A Covert Affair chronicles their friendship with a brilliant and eccentric array of OSS agents, including Jane Foster, a wealthy, free-spirited artist, and Elizabeth MacDonald, an adventurous young reporter. In Paris after the war, Julia and Paul remained close to their intelligence colleagues as they struggled to start new lives, only to find themselves drawn into a far more terrifying spy drama. Relying on recently unclassified OSS and FBI documents, as well as previously unpublished letters and diaries, Conant vividly depicts a dangerous time in American history, when those who served their country suddenly found themselves called to account for their unpopular opinions and personal relationships.

 Lost in Shangri-la: a true story of survival, adventure, and the most incredible rescue mission of World War II

On May 13, 1945, twenty-four American servicemen and WACs boarded a transport plane for a sightseeing trip over Shangri-La, a beautiful and mysterious valley deep within the jungle-covered mountains of Dutch New Guinea. Unlike the peaceful Tibetan monks of James Hilton’s bestselling novel Lost Horizon, this Shangri-La was home to spear-carrying tribesmen, warriors rumored to be cannibals. But the pleasure tour became an unforgettable battle for survival when the plane crashed. Miraculously, three passengers pulled through. Margaret Hastings, barefoot and burned, had no choice but to wear her dead best friend’s shoes. John McCollom, grieving the death of his twin brother also aboard the plane, masked his grief with stoicism. Kenneth Decker, too, was severely burned and suffered a gaping head wound. Emotionally devastated, badly injured, and vulnerable to the hidden dangers of the jungle, the trio faced certain death unless they left the crash site. Caught between man-eating headhunters and enemy Japanese, the wounded passengers endured a harrowing hike down the mountainside-a journey into the unknown that would lead them straight into a primitive tribe of superstitious natives who had never before seen a white man-or woman. Drawn from interviews, declassified U.S. Army documents, personal photos and mementos, a survivor’s diary, a rescuer’s journal, and original film footage, Lost in Shangri-La recounts this incredible true-life adventure for the first time. Mitchell Zuckoff reveals how the determined trio-dehydrated, sick, and in pain-traversed the dense jungle to find help; how a brave band of paratroopers risked their own lives to save the survivors; and how a cowboy colonel attempted a previously untested rescue mission to get them out. By trekking into the New Guinea jungle, visiting remote villages, and rediscovering the crash site, Zuckoff also captures the contemporary natives’ remembrances of the long-ago day when strange creatures fell from the sky. A riveting work of narrative nonfiction that vividly brings to life an odyssey at times terrifying, enlightening, and comic, Lost in Shangri-La is a thrill ride from beginning to end.

 Last Men Out: the true story of America’s heroic final hours in Vietnam

The monsoon winds swirling up from the South China Sea had doubled in magnitude as Marine Staff Sergeant Mike Sullivan stood on the roof of the American Embassy, watching North Vietnamese artillery pound Saigon’s airport. It was late in the afternoon of April 29, 1975, and for the past eight days the airstrip had been the busiest in the world as flight after flight of United States cargo planes ferried Vietnamese refugees, American civilians, and soldiers of both countries to safety while 150,000 North Vietnamese troops marched on the city. With Saigon now encircled and the airport bombed out, thousands were trapped. Last Men Out tells the remarkable story of the drama that unfolded over the next twenty-four hours: the final, heroic chapter of the Vietnam War as improvised by a small unit of Marines, a vast fleet of helicopter pilots flying nonstop missions beyond regulation, and a Marine general who vowed to arrest any officer who ordered his choppers grounded while his men were still on the ground. It would become the largest-scale evacuation ever carried out—what many would call an American Dunkirk.In a gripping, moment-by-moment narrative based on a wealth of recently declassified documents and indepth interviews, Bob Drury and Tom Clavin focus on the story of the eleven young Marines who were the last men to leave, rescued from the Embassy roof just moments before capture, having voted to make an Alamo-like last stand. As politicians in Washington struggled to put the best face on disaster and the American ambassador refused to acknowledge that the end had come and to evacuate, these courageous men held their ground and helped save thousands of lives. They and their fellow troops on the ground and in the air had no room for error as frenzy broke out in the streets and lashing rains and enemy fire began to pelt the city. One Marine pilot, Captain Gerry Berry, flew for eighteen straight hours and had to physically force the American ambassador onto his helicopter.Drury and Clavin gained unprecedented access to the survivors, to the declassified “After-Action reports” of the operation, and to the transmissions among helicopter pilots, their officers, and officials in Saigon secretly recorded by the National Security Agency. They deliver a taut and stirring account of a turning point in American history which unfolds with the heart-stopping urgency of the best thrillers—a riveting true story finally told, in full, by those who lived it.

 Presidential Leadership: 15 decisions that changed the nation

A contributor to US News & World Report.com, examines major decisions of the presidency and the stories behind them. He brings the presidency and its big decisions to life with his unique storytelling and highlights the lessons to be learned.

 Resurrecting Allegheny City: the land, structures and people of Pittsburgh’s North Side

In 1907, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania annexed a large land tract that already had an illustrious history as its own city– the third largest and most prosperous in the state. What then on became known as the North Side of Pittsburgh was originally a place called Allegheny City, annexed against its will. Despite eventual acclimation and further prosperity, its identity, indelible, hangs as a mist over the storied land– for historians, homeowners and visitors that today see all the modern spectacles set on the age-old stage, the lowland at the juncture of three majestic rivers. Resurrecting Allegheny City presents the cultural and social history of this lost society of Allegheny. It looks in-depth at the natives who put down footpath and, filled with significant maps, presents the long transformation of the land. Though now part of Pittsburgh for over one hundred years, the hills and valleys, woods and runs, burial ground, overlooks and sunken islands are all imprints of the catalysts that occurred here. This portrait of a place tells a tale from earliest time to present day– showing a forward-moving society of the 1800s centered around a town square of the 1790s, presenting life in pre-twentieth century homes, and even addressing recent era where modern homesteaders have successfully battled challenges. It explains why, in 2007, many Pittsburgh Northsiders are sacredly tied to their neighborhood, their historic homes, and the very land upon which they find themselves rooted. They are defined, still, by Allegheny City.

Biography

 Every Day by the Sun: a memoir of the Faulkners of Mississippi

In Every Day by the Sun, Dean Faulkner Wells recounts the story of the Faulkners of Mississippi, whose legacy includes pioneers, noble and ignoble war veterans, three never-convicted murderers, the builder of the first railroad in north Mississippi, the founding president of a bank, an FBI agent, four pilots (all brothers), and a Nobel Prize winner, arguably the most important American novelist of the twentieth century. She also reveals wonderfully entertaining and intimate stories and anecdotes about her family-in particular her uncle William, or Pappy, with whom she shared colorful, sometimes utterly frank, sometimes whimsical, conversations and experiences. This deeply felt memoir explores the close relationship between Dean’s uncle and her father, Dean Swift Faulkner, a barnstormer killed at age twenty-eight during an air show four months before she was born. It was William who gave his youngest brother an airplane, and after Dean’s tragic death, William helped to raise his niece. He paid for her education, gave her away when she was married, and maintained a unique relationship with her throughout his life.

 Stories I Only Tell My Friends: an autobiography

A wryly funny and surprisingly moving account of an extraordinary life lived almost entirely in the public eye. A teen idol at fifteen, an international icon and founder of the Brat Pack at twenty, and one of Hollywood’s top stars to this day, Rob Lowe chronicles his experiences as a painfully misunderstood child actor in Ohio uprooted to the wild counterculture of mid-seventies Malibu, where he embarked on his unrelenting pursuit of a career in Hollywood. The Outsiders placed Lowe at the birth of the modern youth movement in the entertainment industry. During his time on The West Wing, he witnessed the surreal nexus of show business and politics both on the set and in the actual White House. And in between are deft and humorous stories of the wild excesses that marked the eighties, leading to his quest for family and sobriety. Never mean-spirited or salacious, Lowe delivers unexpected glimpses into his successes, disappointments, relationships, and one-of-a-kind encounters with people who shaped our world over the last twenty-five years. These stories are as entertaining as they are unforgettable.

 Robert Redford

Draws on the actor, director, and producer’s personal documents to offer insight into his complex life behind his famous roles, discussing the death of his son, his relationship with Sydney Pollack, and his establishment of the Sundance Film Festival.

 From This Moment On

Born Eilleen Regina Edwards in 1965 in rural Canada, Shania Twain has lived a life rife with triumph and tragedy. Aged two, her parents had divorced, and by early childhood, her family of seven was often without food, at times living in a filthy one bedroom apartment. Her stepfather’s abuse forced her mother to move with five children into a homeless shelter, and when she wasn’t working in McDonald’s to support her family, she was out chopping wood. But when her mother and stepfather were tragically killed in an automobile accident when she was 22, Shania knew that the only way to lift her family out of poverty was to use her singing talent and become a full-time performer. At an age when most young people have only themselves to think about, Shania moved her entire family to a nearby resort where she began performing, supporting her brothers and sisters. Shania takes the reader back to these pivotal moments of her hardscrabble childhood, revealing in stark detail the difficulties she and her family faced. Shania writes of being discovered her time performing in Nashville and her sudden, dramatic rise to stardom. Shania will spare no details about her recent personal struggles and heartbreaks subjects about which she’s never spoken publicly. This remarkable book is the story of a brave, honest, and genuine woman who faced odds and downfalls most people never experience, yet has succeeded beyond anyone’s expectations.

 Does the Noise in My Head Bother You?

The son of a classicial pianist straight out of the Bronx, Steven Tyler was born to be a rock star. The frontman of one of the world’s most revered and infamous bands tells of the debauchery, the money, the notoriety, the fights, and the rehab while also revealing his spiritual side that gets lost behind the stereotype of the Sex Guy, the Drug Guy, the Screamin’ Demon, the Terror of the Tropicana.

  If You Ask Me: (and of course you won’t)

It-girl Betty White delivers a hilarious, slyly profound take on love, life, celebrity, and everything in between. Drawing from a lifetime of lessons learned, seven-time Emmy winner Betty White’s wit and wisdom take center stage as she tackles topics like friendship, romantic love, aging, television, fans, love for animals, and the brave new world of celebrity.  If You Ask Me mixes her thoughtful observations with humorous stories from a seven- decade career in Hollywood. Longtime fans and new fans alike will relish Betty’s candid take on everything from her rumored crush on Robert Redford (true) to her beauty regimen (“I have no idea what color my hair is and I never intend to find out”) to the Facebook campaign that helped persuade her to host Saturday Night Live despite her having declined the hosting job three times already. Featuring all-new material, with a focus on the past fifteen years of her life, If You Ask Me is funny, sweet, and to the point-just like Betty White.

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