August 2009 Non-Fiction

 The Six Ways of Atheism by Geoffrey Berg

Geoffrey Berg, a graduate of Cambridge University, England, believes the case for atheism has never been put in as forceful and logically cogent a way as it merits, least of all by the great philosophers. In this book he sets out to remedy that by strengthening some traditional atheistic arguments and by initiating some new logical arguments for atheism. Geoffrey Berg develops six simple completely logical arguments in clear language that practically everybody can understand in a way that has never been done before to prove that belief in God is not merely unsupported by Logic but is actually contrary to Logic. This is a groundbreaking book because it is probably the first attempt by a single author that devotes an entire book to absolutely disproving the existence of God, all the time matching verbal arguments with strictly logical formulations of the argument. It aims to crystallize the case for atheism in a way that has not been done before. It is likely in retrospect to be seen as a landmark book because some of the novel arguments in this book are likely to be used hereafter by people around the world.

 How to Expand Love by His Holiness the Dalai Lama

In our quest for true happiness and fulfillment during the course of our lives, nothing is more essential than giving and receiving love. But how well do we understand love’s extraordinarily transformative powers? Can we really cultivate and appreciate its priceless gifts?InHow to Expand Love,His Holiness the Dalai Lama, winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, offers a simple yet illuminating program for transforming self-centered energy into outwardly directed compassion. Drawing on exercises and techniques established in Tibetan monasteries more than a thousand years ago, the Dalai Lama guides us through seven key stages.First, we learn ways to move beyond our self-defeating tendency to put others into rigid categories. We discover how to create and maintain a positive attitude toward those around us, in ever-widening circles. By reflecting on the kindnesses that close friends have shown us, particularly in childhood, we learn to reciprocate and help other people achieve their own long-term goals. And in seeking the well-being of others, we foster compassion, the all-encompassing face of love.In this accessible and insightful book, His Holiness the Dalai Lama helps us to open our hearts and minds to the experience of unlimited love, transforming every relationship in our lives and guiding us ever closer to wisdom and enlightenment.

 The Last Best Hope by Joe Scarborough

In this groundbreaking book, Joe Scarborough tells Republican Party bosses what they don’t want to hear, explains why Democrats are making matters so much worse, and then shows leaders of both parties the way forward.

 The Big Rewind by Nathan Rabin

As a child and teenager, Nathan Rabin viewed pop culture as a life-affirming form of escape. Today, pop culture is his life. For more than a decade, he’s served as head writer forA.V. Club, the entertainment section ofThe Onion. InThe Big Rewind, Rabin shares his too-strange-for-fiction life story. From a psilocybin-addled trip to the Anne Frank House to having focus groups for his movie-review panel show opine that all the male critics seemed “gay” and that the show as a whole was “too gay,” Rabin discusses his personal evolution in prose as hilarious as it is unexpectedly poignant.Using a specific song, album, book, film, or television show as a springboard to discuss a period in his life, Rabin recounts his heartwarming tale of triumph over adversity® with biting wit and unwise candor. The pop culture touchstones Rabin uses here reflect his broad frame of reference with comic dissertations onThe Simpsons,The Catcher in the Rye, Dr. Dre,Grey Gardens,The Great Gatsby, the Magnetic Fields, the uncanny parallels between Ol’ Dirty Bastard and John F. Kennedy, and how the stock market mirrors the pimp game.Rabin writes movingly about how pop culture helped save him from suicidal despair, institutionalization, and parental abandonment — throughout a childhood that sent him ricocheting from a mental hospital to a foster home to a group home for emotionally disturbed adolescents.The Big Rewindis also a touching narrative of a motherless child’s search for family and acceptance and a darkly comic valentine to Rabin’s lovable, hard-luck dad.Featuring cameos by Billy Bob Thornton, a vomiting Topher Grace, and Barack Obama,The Big Rewindchronicles the surreal journey of Rabin’s life and its intersection with the dizzying, maddening, wonderful world of entertainment.

Renegade by Richard Wolffe

Before the White House and Air Force One, before the TV ads and the enormous rallies, there was the real Barack Obama: a man wrestling with the momentous decision to run for the presidency, feeling torn about leaving behind a young family, and figuring out how to win the biggest prize in politics. This book is the previously untold and epic story of how a political newcomer with no money and an alien name grew into the world’s most powerful leader. But it is also a uniquely intimate portrait of the person behind the iconic posters and the Secret Service code name Renegade. Drawing on a dozen unplugged interviews with the candidate and president, as well as twenty-one months covering his campaign as it traveled from coast to coast, Richard Wolffe answers the simple yet enduring question about Barack Obama: Who is he? Based on Wolffe’s unprecedented access to Obama, Renegade reveals the making of a president, both on the campaign trail and before he ran for high office. It explains how the politician who emerged in an extraordinary election learned the personal and political skills to succeed during his youth and early career. With cool self-discipline, calculated risk taking, and simple storytelling, Obama developed the strategies he would need to survive the onslaught of the Clintons and John McCain, and build a multimillion-dollar machine to win a historic contest. In Renegade, Richard Wolffe shares with us his front-row seat at Obama’s announcement to run for president on a frigid day in Springfield, and his victory speech on a warm night in Chicago. We fly on the candidate’s plane and ride in his bus on an odyssey across a country in crisis; stand next to him at a bar on the night he secures the nomination; and are backstage as he delivers his convention speech to a stadium crowd and a transfixed national audience. From a teacher’s office in Iowa to the Oval Office in Washington, we see and hear Barack Obama with an immediacy and honesty never witnessed before. Renegade provides not only an account of Obama’s triumphs, but also examines his many personal and political trials. We see Obama wrestling with race and politics, as well as his former pastor Reverend Jeremiah Wright. We see him struggling with life as a presidential candidate, a campaign that falters for most of its first year, and his reaction to a surprise defeat in the New Hampshire primary. And we see him relying on his personal experience, as well as meticulous polling, to pass the presidential test in foreign and economic affairs. Renegade is an essential guide to understanding President Barack Obama and his trusted inner circle of aides and friends. It is also a riveting and enlightening first draft of history and political psychology. From the Hardcover edition.

 The Economic Naturalist’s Field Guide by Robert H. Frank

Ask a dozen talking heads about how the economy works and what course of action we should take and yoursquo;ll get thirteen different answers. But what if we possessed a handful of basic principles that could guide our decisions-both the personal ones about what to buy and how to spend but also those national ones that have been capturing the headlines? Robert H. Frank, (a.k.a. the Economic Naturalist) has been illustrating those principles longer and more clearly than anyone else. InThe Economic Naturalistrsquo;s Field Guide, he reveals how they play out in Washington, on Wall Street, and in our own lives, covering everything from tax policy to financial investment to everyday decisions about saving and spending. In today’s uncertain economic climate,The Economic Naturalist’s Field Guide’s insights have more bearing on our pocketbooks, policies, and personal happiness than ever.

Busted by Edmund L. Andrews

The fiasco that sank millions of Americans, including one journalist, who thought he knew better.A veteran New York Times economics reporter, Edmund L. Andrews was intimately aware of the dangers posed by easy mortgages. But, eager to start a new life, he gave in to temptation and began a surreal adventure into the mortgage mayhem that nearly wrecked America.Busted weaves together the author’s ride to the edge of bankruptcy with the tragic-comic stories of his lenders, the Wall Street professionals behind them and the policymakers in Washington who were oblivious until it was too late. The story takes Andrews to the offices of Alan Greenspan, the California mansions of subprime-mortgage millionaires, a despondent deal makers’ convention in Las Vegas and Wall Street. Busted is a darkly humorous exploration of the cynicism and self-destructive judgement that led to America’s biggest economic calamity in generations.

 How the Mighty Fall by James C. Collins

Decline can be avoided.Decline can be detected.Decline can be reversed.Amidst the desolate landscape of fallen great companies, Jim Collins began to wonder: How do the mighty fall? Can decline be detected early and avoided? How far can a company fall before the path toward doom becomes inevitable and unshakable? How can companies reverse course?In How the Mighty Fall, Collins confronts these questions, offering leaders the well-founded hope that they can learn how to stave off decline and, if they find themselves falling, reverse their course. Collins’ research project-more than four years in duration-uncovered five step-wise stages of decline:Stage 1: Hubris Born of SuccessStage 2: Undisciplined Pursuit of MoreStage 3: Denial of Risk and PerilStage 4: Grasping for SalvationStage 5: Capitulation to Irrelevance or DeathBy understanding these stages of decline, leaders can substantially reduce their chances of falling all the way to the bottom.Great companies can stumble, badly, and recover.Every institution, no matter how great, is vulnerable to decline. There is no law of nature that the most powerful will inevitably remain at the top. Anyone can fall and most eventually do. But, as Collins’ research emphasizes, some companies do indeed recover-in some cases, coming back even stronger-even after having crashed into the depths of Stage 4.Decline, it turns out, is largely self-inflicted, and the path to recovery lies largely within our own hands. We are not imprisoned by our circumstances, our history, or even our staggering defeats along the way. As long as we never get entirely knocked out of the game, hope always remains. The mighty can fall, but they can often rise again.

The Accidental Billionaires by Ben Mezrich

The high-energy tale of how two socially awkward Ivy Leaguers, trying to increase their chances with the opposite sex, ended up creating Facebook. Eduardo Saverin and Mark Zuckerberg were Harvard undergraduates and best friends, outsiders at a school filled with polished prep-school grads and long-time legacies. They shared both academic brilliance in math and a geeky awkwardness with women. Eduardo figured their ticket to social acceptance and sexual success was getting invited to join one of the university’s Final Clubs, a constellation of elite societies that had groomed generations of the most powerful men in the world and ranked on top of the inflexible hierarchy at Harvard. Mark, with less of an interest in what the campus alpha males thought of him, happened to be a computer genius of the first order. Which he used to find a more direct route to social stardom: one lonely night, Mark hacked into the university’s computer system, creating a ratable database of all the female students on campus, and subsequently crashing the university’s servers and nearly getting himself kicked out of school. In that moment, in his Harvard dorm room, the framework for Facebook was born. What followed, a real-life adventure filled with slick venture capitalists, stunning women, and six-foot-five-inch identical-twin Olympic rowers, makes for one of the most entertaining and compelling books of the year. Before long, Eduardo’s and Mark’s different ideas about Facebook created in their relationship faint cracks, which soon spiraled into out-and-out warfare. The collegiate exuberance that marked their collaboration fell prey to the adult world of lawyers and money. The great irony is that while Facebook succeeded by bringing people together, its very success tore two best friends apart. The Accidental Billionaires is a compulsively readable story of innocence lost and of the unusual creation of a company that has revolutionized the way hundreds of millions of people relate to one another. Ben Mezrich, a Harvard graduate, has published ten books, including the New York Times bestseller Bringing Down the House. He is a columnist for Boston Common and a contributor for Flush magazine. Ben lives in Boston with his wife, Tonya. From the Hardcover edition.

 The Snakehead by Patrick Radden Keefe

A mesmerizing narrative about the rise and fall of an unlikely international crime boss In the 1980s, a wave of Chinese from Fujian province began arriving in America. Like other immigrant groups before them, they showed up with little money but with an intense work ethic and an unshakeable belief in the promise of the United States. Many of them lived in a world outside the law, working in a shadow economy overseen by the ruthless gangs that ruled the narrow streets of New York’s Chinatown. The figure who came to dominate this Chinese underworld was a middle-aged grandmother known as Sister Ping. Her path to the American dream began with an unusual business run out of a tiny noodle store on Hester Street. From her perch above the shop, Sister Ping ran a full-service underground bank for illegal Chinese immigrants. But her real business-a business that earned an estimated $40 million-was smuggling people. As a “snakehead,” she built a complex—and often vicious—global conglomerate, relying heavily on familial ties, and employing one of Chinatown’s most violent gangs to protect her power and profits. Like an underworld CEO, Sister Ping created an intricate smuggling network that stretched from Fujian Province to Hong Kong to Burma to Thailand to Kenya to Guatemala to Mexico. Her ingenuity and drive were awe-inspiring both to the Chinatown community—where she was revered as a homegrown Don Corleone—and to the law enforcement officials who could never quite catch her. Indeed, Sister Ping’s empire only came to light in 1993 when theGolden Venture, a ship loaded with 300 undocumented immigrants, ran aground off a Queens beach. It took New York’s fabled “Jade Squad” and the FBI nearly ten years to untangle the criminal network and home in on its unusual mastermind. THE SNAKEHEAD is a panoramic tale of international intrigue and a dramatic portrait of the underground economy in which America’s twelve million illegal immigrants live. Based on hundreds of interviews, Patrick Radden Keefe’s sweeping narrative tells the story not only of Sister Ping, but of the gangland gunslingers who worked for her, the immigration and law enforcement officials who pursued her, and the generation of penniless immigrants who risked death and braved a 17,000 mile odyssey so that they could realize their own version of the American dream.The Snakeheadoffers an intimate tour of life on the mean streets of Chinatown, a vivid blueprint of organized crime in an age of globalization and a masterful exploration of the ways in which illegal immigration affects us all.

 Dillinger’s Wild Ride by Elliot J. Gorn

In an era that witnessed the rise of celebrity outlaws like Baby Face Nelson, Pretty Boy Floyd, and Bonnie and Clyde, John Dillinger was the most famous and flamboyant of them all. Reports on the man and his misdeeds–spiced with accounts of his swashbuckling bravado and cool daring–provided an America worn down by the Great Depression with a salacious mix of sex and violence that proved irresistible. In Dillinger’s Wild Ride, Elliott J. Gorn provides a riveting account of the year between 1933 and 1934, when the Dillinger gang pulled over a dozen bank jobs, and stole hundreds of thousands of dollars. A dozen men–police, FBI agents, gangsters, and civilians–lost their lives in the rampage, and American newspapers breathlessly followed every shooting and jail-break. As Dillinger’s wild year unfolded, the tale grew larger and larger in newspapers and newsreels, and even today, Dillinger is the subject of pulp literature, serious poetry and fiction, and films, including a new movie starring Johnny Depp. What is the power of his story? Why has it lingered so long? Who was John Dillinger? Gorn illuminates the significance of Dillinger’s tremendous fame and the endurance of his legacy, arguing that he represented an American fascination with primitive freedom against social convention. Dillinger’s story has much to tell us about our enduring fascination with outlaws, crime and violence, about the complexity of our transition from rural to urban life, and about the transformation of America during the Great Depression. Dillinger’s Wild Ride is a compulsively readable story with an unforgettable protagonist.

 The Love Pirate and the Bandit’s Son by Laura James

Sparks flew when gold digger Dr. Zeo Zoe Wilkins and Jesse James, Jr.—the son of America’s most legendary outlaw—crossed paths. The result: a tale of sex, deceit, money, and murder, grippingly told by noted true-crime blogger Laura James. The beautiful Wilkins—a scheming and oft-married osteopath—was no shrinking violet; she married and probably buried five husbands (or six, according to some reports), some decades older, and all much wealthier, than she. But she was no match for the nefarious Jesse Jr., whom the author argues stabbed Zeo to death in her Kansas City home in 1924.nbsp;(The murder was never officially solved.) Laura James maps out the childhood, career, and marital machinations of this ravishing “love pirate” before charting the promising but invariably disappointing life of the bandit’s only son.nbsp;In the book’s third section, the two indelible characters collide, with lethal consequences for Wilkins. nbsp;Ably mixing historical conjecture with forensic fact, Laura James conducts a blow-by-blow reconstruction of their tumultuous relationship, including evidence that she believes convicts Jesse James, Jr. nbsp; – The public’s appetite for this kind of book seems nearly inexhaustible, as evidenced by T.J. Stiles’ biography of the elder James, an award-winning, near-bestseller for Random House in 2004, as well as Brad Pitt’s star turn as James in the 2007 movieThe Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford, based on the Ron Hansen novel nbsp; – This is the first book to thoroughly investigate Zeo’s story nbsp; – Through her blog, the author has gained a strong following of true-crime readers

 Spanish Phrase Book & Dictionary

 500 Things to East Before It’s Too Late and The Very Best Places to Eat Them by Jane and Michael Stern

What are the all-time best dishes America has to offer, the ones you must taste before they vanish, so delicious they deserve to be a Holy Grail for travelers? Where’s the most vibrant Key lime pie in Florida? The most sensational chiles rellenos in New Mexico? The most succulent fried clams on the Eastern Seaboard? The most memorable whoopie pies, gumbos, tacos, cheese steaks, crab feasts? In500 Things to Eat Before It’s Too Late,”America’s leading authorities on the culinary delights to be found while driving” (Newsweek) return to their favorite subject with a colorful, bursting-at-the-seams life list of America’s must-eats.Illustrated throughout with mouth-watering color photos and road maps, this indispensable guide is organized by region, then by state. Each entry captures the food in luscious detail and gives the lowdown on the café, roadside stand, or street cart where it’s served. When “bests” abound—hot dogs, hamburgers, pizza, apple pie, doughnuts—the Sterns rank their offerings. Sidebars feature profiles of idiosyncratic creators, recipes, and local attractions.

 The Upside of the Downturn by Geoffrey Colvin

Some businesses–and some people–will emerge from this downturn stronger and more dominant than when it started. Others will weaken and fade. It all depends on critical choices they make right now. Geoff Colvin, one of America’s most respected business journalists, says even the scariest recession has an upside. The best managers know conventional thinking won’t help them win in these tough times. They’re taking smart, practical steps that will not only keep them strong, but will also distance them from the pack for years to come. The dozens of top-performing leaders Colvin interviewed reject the common view that slashing costs and firing employees are all that matter. They see the recession as a rich opportunity to reinvent their organizations and lay the groundwork for future growth. Colvin’s ten solidly grounded strategies will increase your company’s competitiveness and build its long-term value. A sample: · Reset priorities. Easy to say, harder to do. Pursuing the lofty goals set in good times can be disastrous now. · Reevaluate people and steal some good ones. Mass layoffs are a tempting way to cut costs, but great companies often find smarter alternatives. And if your competitors are dumb enough to fire their best people, grab them. · Keep investing in the core. Trim the fat from your budgets but not the muscle. The best companies actually increase some spending in a recession, funding the areas that make them unique and valuable. · Don’t rush to cut prices. Many companies assume they must – yet the long-term damage often outweighs the short-term boost. Colvin shows how these strategies really work, using examples of major companies that have applied them with inspiring results.

 Knitting in Tuscany by Nicky Epstein

From the bestselling author of “Knitting Over the Edge” and “Knitting Beyond the Edge” comes an exciting new book inspired by Epstein’s knitting tour of the Tuscan countryside.

 Big Book of Quilting

A compilation of four previously published books on quilting.

Quick and Easy Quiltmaking

 Born to Run by Christopher McDougall

Full of incredible characters, amazing athletic achievements, cutting-edge science, and, most of all, pure inspiration, Born to Run is an epic adventure that began with one simple question: Why does my foot hurt? In search of an answer, Christopher McDougall sets off to find a tribe of the world’s greatest distance runners and learn their secrets, and in the process shows us that everything we thought we knew about running is wrong. Isolated by the most savage terrain in North America, the reclusive Tarahumara Indians of Mexico’s deadly Copper Canyons are custodians of a lost art. For centuries they have practiced techniques that allow them to run hundreds of miles without rest and chase down anything from a deer to an Olympic marathoner while enjoying every mile of it. Their superhuman talent is matched by uncanny health and serenity, leaving the Tarahumara immune to the diseases and strife that plague modern existence. With the help of Caballo Blanco, a mysterious loner who lives among the tribe, the author was able not only to uncover the secrets of the Tarahumara but also to find his own inner ultra-athlete, as he trained for the challenge of a lifetime: a fifty-mile race through the heart of Tarahumara country pitting the tribe against an odd band of Americans, including a star ultramarathoner, a beautiful young surfer, and a barefoot wonder. With a sharp wit and wild exuberance, McDougall takes us from the high-tech science labs at Harvard to the sun-baked valleys and freezing peaks across North America, where ever-growing numbers of ultrarunners are pushing their bodies to the limit, and, finally, to the climactic race in the Copper Canyons. Born to Run is that rare book that will not only engage your mind but inspire your body when you realize that the secret to happiness is right at your feet, and that you, indeed all of us, were born to run.

 Greetings from the Lincoln Highway by Brian Butko

The Lincoln Highway, conceived by an automotive accessories manufacturer named Carl Fisher in 1912, was hardly a highway by today’s standards. It was more a web of existing roads and short stretches of new construction, all dotted with visible road markers, that finally gave motorists a single route to follow from New York to California. Before its inception, motorists, few as they were, would often have to take old wagon trails, especially in the West, and cut down wire fences along the way. Although the Lincoln Highway was barely an interstate in the modern sense, it was a massive improvement, though within a decade it was overshadowed by the fabled Route 66 and is now just a series of “faint traces.” Butko’s easygoing, state-by-state account is a fun amble through 14 states including West Virginia, Indiana, Iowa, Colorado and Utah, not overly nostalgic, yet indulging in remembrances of old diners and corny roadside attractions, like the Shoe House, a five-story building shaped like a work boot in Pennsylvania. Butko (Diners of Pennsylvania) peppers the narrative with quotes from early 20th-century travelogues, and the inclusion of snapshots and old postcards establishes a chatty ambience. Although readers will probably want to skip around (the descriptions of the highway in some states are dull), this is a detailed and well-illustrated travel diary. 351 color, 54 b&w photos; 15 color maps. (May) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

 Defiance by Nechama Tec

The history of a Jewish partisan group, a forest community established in 1942 in western Belorussia, that would number more than 1,200 by 1944–the largest armed rescue of Jews by Jews in WWII. Drawing on wide-ranging research and original interviews with survivor partisans–including charismatic leader Tuvia Bielski himself, two weeks before his death in 1987–Tec reconstructs the lives of those in the community and tells how they survived in a hostile environment. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

 Tears in the Darkness by Michael Norman

This major new work about World War II exposes the myths of military heroism as shallow and inadequate. “Tears in the Darkness” makes clear, with great literary and human power, that war causes suffering for people on all sides.

 Horse Soldiers by Doug Stanton

From the New York Times-bestselling author of In Harm’s Way comes a true-life story of American soldiers overcoming great odds to achieve a stunning military victory. Horse Soldiers is the dramatic account of a small band of Special Forces soldiers who secretly entered Afghanistan following 9/11 and rode to war on horses against the Taliban. Outnumbered forty to one, they pursued the enemy across mountainous terrain and, after a series of intense battles, captured the city of Mazar-i-Sharif, which was strategically essential if they were to defeat the Taliban.The bone-weary American soldiers were welcomed as liberators, and overjoyed Afghans thronged the streets. Then the action took a wholly unexpected turn. During a surrender of six hundred Taliban troops, the Horse Soldiers were ambushed. Dangerously outnumbered, they fought for their lives in the city’s immense fortress, Qala-i-Janghi, or the House of War. At risk were the military gains of the entire campaign: if the soldiers perished or were captured, the effort to defeat the Taliban might be doomed. As the Americans struggled to hold the fortress, they faced some of the most intense urban warfare of our time. But until now the full story of the Horse Soldiers has never been told. Doug Stanton received unprecedented cooperation from the U.S. Army’s Special Forces soldiers and Special Operations helicopter pilots, as well as access to voluminous after-battle reports. In addition, he interviewed more than one hundred participants and walked every inch of the climactic battleground.This exciting story is filled with unforgettable characters: brave Special Forces soldiers, tough CIA operatives, cunning Afghan warlords, anxious stateside soldiers’ wives who do not know where their husbands have gone, and humble Afghan boys spying on the Taliban. Deeply researched and beautifully written, Stanton’s account of America’s quest to liberate an oppressed people touches the mythic. The Horse Soldiers combined ancient strategies of cavalry warfare with twenty-first-century aerial bombardment technology to perform a seemingly impossible feat. Moreover, their careful effort to win the hearts of local townspeople and avoid civilian casualties proved a valuable lesson for America’s ongoing efforts in Afghanistan. Horse Soldiers is a big-hearted and thrilling read, with an epic story that reaches not just across the cold mountains of Afghanistan but into the homes of small-town America, and confirms Doug Stanton as one of our country’s preeminent storytellers.

 Glenn Beck’s Common Sense

In any era, great Americans inspire us to reach our full potential. They know with conviction what they believe within themselves. They understand that all actions have consequences. And they find commonsense solutions to the nation’s problems.

 Crazy for the Storm by Norman Ollestad

A heart-stopping adventure that ends in tragedy and in triumphs, [“Crazy for the Storm” is] a love story that fearlessly explores the bond between a father and son and what it means to lead a life without limits.–Susan Cheever. bw photo insert.

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